Bear Divide Trail

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View from Bear Divide, western Angeles National Forest

Looking northwest from the top of Bear Divide

View from Santa Clara Divide Road, Angeles National Forest

View of the high desert from Santa Clara Divide Road

Bear Divide Trail

  • Location: Western Angeles National Forest between the San Fernando Valley, Santa Clarita Valley and Little Tujunga Canyon. From I-210 in Pacoima, take the Osborne St. exit. Cross the freeway on Foothill Blvd. and turn left on Osborne St. Follow it for 11.4 miles. (Osborne becomes Little Tujunga Canyon Road) to the Bear Divide Picnic Area. Turn left on Santa Clara Truck Trail and follow it 0.2 miles and park in a dirt turnout on the right side of the road. From the 14 Freeway, exit at Placerita Canyon Road and follow it east for 5 miles to its end at Sand Canyon Road. Turn right on Sand Canyon, which becomes Little Tujunga Canyon, and follow it 3 miles to the Bear Divide Picnic Area. Turn right on Santa Clarita Truck Trail and follow it 0.2 miles to the turnout on the right. The unsigned trail starts right next to the road. Though no signage indicates that a National Forest Service Adventure Pass is needed to park here, most of the trail heads in the area do require it so if you have one, consider bringing it to be safe. Click here to purchase one.
  • Agency: Angeles National Forest, Los Angeles River Ranger District
  • Distance: 4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,200 feet
  • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
  • Difficulty rating: PG-13 (elevation gain, steepness)
  • Best season: October – June
  • USGS topo map: San Fernando
  • Recommended gear: hiking poles; insect repellent
  • More information: Trip description here; video about the hike here
  • Rating: 7
Start of the Bear Divide Trail, Angeles National Forest

0:00 – Bear Divide Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Considering its proximity to the Santa Clarita, Antelope and San Fernando Valleys–and its excellent views of them–it’s surprising this trail isn’t better known. Adding to the appeal are the tall pines and black oaks on the north facing slope, providing welcome shade from the Antelope Valley heat.

Bear Divide Trail leading through chaparral, Angeles National Forest

0:03 – Right turn on the Bear Divide Trail (times are approximate)

Bear Divide is a ridge that stretches westward from Little Tujunga Canyon, rising above the San Fernando Valley to the south and the Antelope and Santa Clarita Valleys to the north. The unsigned Bear Divide Trail starts off inauspiciously with a steep climb up a loose and rocky incline. At just over a tenth of a mile (and 150 vertical feet of climbing) it bends to the right where it enters the shade of chaparral. A steep trail continues straight; intrepid hikers can use this as an alternative ascent or descent, making the hike into a loop.

Oak growing out of the rocks on the Bear Divide Trail, Angeles National Forest

0:19 – “Ninja oak!”

The trail follows the north side of the ridge, providing excellent views of the Santa Clarita Valley. The steep ascent continues before finally leveling off at about 0.4 miles from the start. Soon after you enter an attractive grove of black oaks and Coulter pines. Keep an eye out for one rogue black oak in particular, growing nearly sideways from the rocky ridge.

Footbridge on the Bear Divide Trail, Angeles National Forest

0:28 – Footbridge

Shortly before a mile, you cross a footbridge and soon after you begin a steep set of switchbacks. Fortunately you’re still in the shade, making the 400-plus feet of elevation gain in less than a mile more tolerable. The majestic pines make it seem as if you’re higher up than your actual altitude of about 3,400 feet.

Looking north from Santa Clarita Truck Trail, Angeles National Forest

0:51 – Looking north from Santa Clara Truck Trail

At 1.5 miles, you rejoin Santa Clara Truck Trail. Bear right and follow it past the fire station. At a junction where Santa Clarita heads downhill and continues west, follow the left fork to a high point (about 4,000 feet above sea level) on the ridge with several communications antennas. Just before a fence blocks the road, a trail leads a short distance to a big, flat summit where you can enjoy a panoramic view. If visibility is good, expect to see Catalina Island, the Hollywood Hills, the Santa Monica Mountains, the Topatopa Mountains, the Liebre Mountains and more.

View of the San Fernando Valley from Santa Clara Truck Trail

1:01 – The San Fernando Valley from just past the fire station

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Looking southwest from the top of Bear Divide, Angeles National Forest

1:10 – Southwest view from the “summit” of Bear Divide


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Grape Avenue Trail Loop (Crafton Hills)

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San Bernardino Peak as seen from the Grape Avenue Trail, Crafton Hills, Yucaipa CA

San Bernardino Peak as seen from the Grape Avenue Trail

East Reservoir as seen from the Grape Avenue Trail, Crafton Hills, Yucaipa, CA

East Reservoir as seen from the Grape Avenue Trail

 Grape Avenue Trail Loop (Crafton Hills)

  • Location: Crafton Hills near Yucaipa.  From I-10, take the Live Oak Canyon Road/Oak Glen Road exit and head northwest for 4.2 miles to Bryant St. Turn left and go 1.1 miles to Grape Avenue. Turn left and go 0.5 miles to an unsigned trail head on the left side of the road.
  • Agency:  Crafton Hills Open Space Conservancy
  • Distance:  4.5 miles
  • Elevation gain:  1,000 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 2 hours
  • Best season: October – April
  • Recommended gear: hiking polessun hat
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
  • USGS topo map: Yucaipa
  • More information: Trip description here
  • Rating: 6
Grape Avenue Trail Head, Crafton Hills, Yucaipa, CA

0:00 – Trail head on Grape Avenue (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This loop, which explores the eastern end of the Crafton Hills, is proof that a hike doesn’t have to go into the wilderness to feel rugged and wild. Although the sights and sounds of civilization are always at hand, this route’s dramatic mountain views (of San Bernardino Peak in particular), sharp switchbacks and up-close aerial perspectives on Highway 38 make it more visually interesting than many hikes that are more geographically remote.

Descending from a ridge on the Grape Avenue Trail, Crafton Hills, Yucaipa, CA

0:09 – The trail descending from the ridge (times are approximate)

From Grape Avenue, take the unsigned trail into a patch of chaparral and climb to a ridge (0.3 miles). Follow it briefly and look for a trail leading downhill to the right. You drop down to a service road, cross it and pick up the trail which climbs to another ridge, providing views of the East Reservoir. The trail merges into a paved service road which you follow a short distance.

Right before the road curves sharply downhill, leave it and follow the trail to a junction (0.9 miles from the start). This is the beginning of the loop, which can be hiked in either direction. By hiking clockwise, as described here, you can knock off the majority of the climbing early on. (The left fork is signed for Zanja Peak; the right fork is signed as the 38 Loop due to its proximity to that highway).

Junction on the Grape Avenue Trail, Crafton Hills, Yucaipa, CA

0:27 – Start of the loop

Bear left and head uphill, zigzagging your way across the eastern slope of the Crafton Hills. In addition to the imposing view of San Bernardino Peak and the Yucaipa Ridge, you also get an aerial view of the reservoir and in the distance, if visibility is good, you may even be able to pick out the Palomar Mountains of San Diego County.

Descending the Crafton Hills on the Grape Avenue Trail

0:54 – Starting the descent from the junction at the top of the loop

After almost a mile of steady climbing, you reach a junction (1.8 miles from the start). This is the high point of the loop. You can extend your trip to Zanja Peak by heading left, but to continue with the loop, take the right fork and begin your descent. On the way down, you get a good view of the eastern San Gabriel Mountains.

The twisting descent follows both sides of a ridge, dropping down into a canyon and coming out at the service road (3 miles). Turn right and follow the road briefly to pick up another trail, which climbs back up to the junction, completing the loop. From here, retrace your steps back to Grape Avenue.

The San Gabriel Mountains as seen from the north side of the Crafton Hills, Yucaipa, CA

1:00 – View of the San Gabriel Mountains

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

North side of the Crafton Hills on the Grape Avenue Trail, Yucaipa, CA

1:10 – Following the north side of the ridge

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Pratt/Foothill Loop (Ojai)

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Panoramic view of the Los Padres National Forest from the Pratt Trail

View of the Topatopa Mountains and fall foliage from the Pratt Trail

Sunset from the Foothill Trail, Los Padres National Forest, Ojai, CA

Sunset from the Foothill Trail

Pratt/Foothill Loop (Ojai)

    • Location: Foothills north of Ojai. From Highway 101, take Highway 33 north for 13.2 miles to downtown Ojai. Follow Ojai Ave (Higway 150) for a mile and turn left on Signal St. Follow Signal St. for 0.5 miles to an intersection with Grand Avenue and bear left to stay on Signal Street. Follow it 0.4 miles more to the signed Los Padres National Forest trail head. Turn left and go 0.2 miles on a semi-paved road to a circular parking lot. From Highway 126 in Santa Paula, take Highway 150 northwest for 16.7 miles. Turn right on Signal St. and follow it to the trail head.
    • Agency: Los Padres National Forest/Ojai Ranger District
    • Distance: 5.4 miles
    • Elevation gain: 1,450 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Elevation gain, steepness)
    • Suggested time: 3 hours
    • Best season:  October – June
    • USGS topo maps: Matilija; Ojai
    • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sun hat; sunblock
    • Recommended guidebook: Day Hikes Around Santa Barbara
    • More information: Area trail map here; Tripadvisor page here
    • Rating: 7
Pratt Trail Head, Los Padres National Forest, Ojai, CA

0:00 – Pratt Trail beginning (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This challenging, scenic hike explores the foothills north of Ojai, providing excellent mountain and valley views. The lower portion of the Pratt Trail, which starts at a debris basin and weaves through several private properties and service roads, might not be all that inspiring, but once you get higher up, the scenery becomes well worth the effort.

Sign on the Pratt Trail, Los Padres National Forest

0:19 – Sign on the Pratt Trail (times are approximate)

From the parking area, follow the signed Pratt Trail as it makes its way past the debris basin and through a grove of eucalyptus trees. Much of the view is blocked by chaparral, although you do get an occasional glimpse of the valley below. After crossing two service roads, you merge onto Foothill Road and follow it a short distance to a gate (just under a mile from the start, and about 550 feet higher). Just beyond the gate is a water tank, and it’s here that the loop portion of the hike begins.

Sycamores on the Pratt Trail, Los Padres National Forest, Ojai, CA

0:28 – Sycamores on the Pratt Trail just after the junction with the Foothill Trail

If the temperature is high, consider heading left on the more moderate Foothill Trail. If it’s a cool day and you want to get most of the elevation gain behind you quickly, continue on the Pratt Trail, as described here. The counter-clockwise route is good too if you get a late afternoon start; the sun will be hidden by Magic Mountain to the west of the Pratt Trail.

View from the Pratt Trail, Los Padres National Forest

1:00 – Looking west from the saddle

Continue your steady climb, staying straight as the Fuel Break Trail branches off to the right. At about 1.5 miles from the start, the trail briefly levels out as you enter a grove of oaks. Keep an eye out for a short trail leading to a picnic table beneath a sycamore.

The ascent resumes, reaching a saddle two miles from the start. You now get a nice view to the west, and the majority of the climbing is behind you. The Pratt Trail makes a hard right and continues uphill but your route descends, following the north slope of Magic Mountain. After a quarter mile, take a hard right and continue the descent, making an S-curve into oak-shaded Cozy Dell Canyon.

Oaks in the Los Padres National Forest

1:25 – Descending through the oaks in Cozy Dell Canyon

Leaving the woodland, make a hairpin left turn on the signed Foothill Trail (just over 3 miles from the start). You make a short but steep climb, gaining 250 feet in less than half a mile and arriving at a meadow. From here, the trail follows a basically level profile along the ridge, with a few glimpses of the valley to the south. One more ascent brings you to a saddle where you can see the higher peaks of the Topatopa range to the east.

Foothill Trail, Los Padres National Forest, Ojai, CA

1:37 – Hard left on the Foothill Trail

From here, you make a steep descent to a T-junction. Turn right on a connector trail leading back to the Pratt Trail and retrace your steps a mile down the hill to the parking lot.

View from the Foothill Trail, Los Padres National Forest

2:00 – Descent on the Foothill Trail toward the Pratt Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Rock Mountain (Fallbrook)

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View from Rock Mountain, north San Diego County

Morning sun near the top of Rock Mountain

Looking north from Rock Mountain

Looking north from Rock Mountain

Rock Mountain (Fallbrook)

    • Location: North San Diego County, between Fallbrook and Temecula. From the Inland Empire, take I-15 to Rancho California Road in Temecula. Turn right and go 2.5 miles to Avenida del Oro. Turn left and go 0.3 miles to Sandia Creek Road. Turn left and go 7.3 miles and look for a small dirt parking lot and the trail head on the right (De Luz Heights Road = too far.) From the south, take I-15 to Old Highway 395. Turn left and go 0.2 miles to East Mission Road. Go 4.9 miles and turn right on Pico, which becomes De Luz and then Sandia Creek. In 4.2 miles, just after De Luz Heights Road, look for the trail head on the right. From Highway 76, 12.6 miles east of Oceanside, head north on South Mission Road. In 6.7 miles, turn right on West Mission Road and then almost immediately turn left on Pico. Follow it 4.2 miles to the trail head as described above.
    • Agency:  Fallbrook Land Conservancy
    • Distance: 1.2 miles
    • Elevation gain: 550 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG
    • Suggested time: 1 hour
    • Best season: October – May
    • Recomended gear: sun hat
    • USGS topo map: Temecula
    • More information:  All Trails page here; Flickr photo gallery here
    • Rating: 5
0:00 - Rock Mountain Trail Head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Rock Mountain Trail Head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This short but steep hike yields some panoramic views of north San Diego County and southern Riverside County. The hike sadly loses points due to graffiti (particularly on the summit) and trash, but the scramble up the rocks to the summit is still worth doing if you’re in the area. Expect to use your hands as much as your feet and allow extra time for the descent.

Following the trail up Rock Mountain, San Diego County

0:09 – Hard left at the junction (times are approximate)

From the parking lot, follow the signed trail up a wooden staircase. The first half of the hike is fairly easy going as the trail winds around the base of Rock Mountain. There are no shade trees but the slope faces west, so if you get off to an early start the sun will be blocked out.

At about a quarter mile, stay straight as a trail branches off to the right. Soon after, take a hairpin left turn and head west, soon arriving at a clearing (about 0.4 miles from the start) where an abandoned car sits.

Steep stretch of trail on Rock Mountain

0:12 – Steep climb after the abandoned car

From here, the hike becomes challenging. Head straight, climbing up a loose, rutted slope and continue your steep ascent for another tenth of a mile. The trail, sometimes faint but usually pretty obvious, appears to dip downhill and fade out at this point. Look for a use trail on the right, heading straight up through the sage scrub, soon arriving at a saddle where you get some striking aerial views of the landscape below. You also see the summit of Rock Mountain on your left.

Climbing through the brush on the way to Rock Mountain's summit

0:16 – Follow the “use trail” through the brush, about half a mile from the start

Head left and follow a thin ridge toward the peak and then pick your way up over the boulders to the summit. Your exact route may vary but you will generally stay on the south side of the peak, keeping it on your left.

View of Rock Mountain, San Diego County

0:20 – Rock Mountain’s summit, as seen from the saddle

On the top, you can sit on any of the jumble of boulders and enjoy an excellent view which on clear days may include the Palomar Mountains and the ocean. You also get a bird’s eye look at Sandia Creek Road, winding its way through the hills below. When you’re done enjoying the view head back down, respecting the steep and loose terrain on the descent.

View from just below the summit of Rock Mountain

0:22 – Looking south from the ridge below the summit

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Aerial view of the Fallbrook, CA area from Rock Mountain

0:25 – Looking down from the summit of Rock Mountain

Randall Henderson Trail

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San Jacinto Mountains at dusk on the Randall Henderson Trail, Palm Desert, CA

Dusk on the Randall Henderson Trail

Ocotillo cacti on the Randall Henderson Trail, Palm Desert, CA

Ocotillo on the Randall Henderson Trail

Randall Henderson Trail

  • Location: Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Visitors’ Center, 51500 Highway 74, Palm Desert. From I-10, take Monterey Avenue south for 9.7 miles (Monterey Avenue becomes Highway 74). The Visitors’ Center will be on the left, 3.8 miles after the junction with Highway 111. If you are coming from the west on Highway 74, the Visitors’ Center is 20.4 miles east of the junction with Highway 371 and 33 miles east of Highway 243.
  • Agency: Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument
  • Distance: 2.2 miles
  • Elevation gain: 450 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Best season: Year round but hot during the summer. The Visitors’ Center and parking lot is open from 9am to 4pm, Monday-Friday. If you are visiting outside of those hours, park at the Art Smith Trailhead on the opposite side of Highway 74.
  • USGS topo maps: “Rancho Mirage”
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
  • More information: here; Trail descriptions here and here
  • Rating: 5

This short loop is one of the few trails in the Palm Springs area that can be done year-round. It also features several types of desert flora including cat’s claw acacia, ocotillo, cholla, beaver trail and barrel cacti.

Randall Henderson Trail Head, Palm Desert, CA

0:00 – Randall Henderson trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

If you start at the Art Smith Trailhead, carefully cross Highway 74 (there’s no signal or crosswalk but traffic is usually fairly light) and walk into the monument parking lot. The signed Randall Henderson Trail departs from the lot’s southeastern corner. Follow it a short distance to a fork; the start of the loop.

The loop can be hiked in either direction. The right fork follows an exposed ridge; a good choice if you are starting early in the morning or if the weather is cool.  If the sun is up and the temperature is warm, take the left fork, which heads up a wash, providing up-close looks at some intriguing geology. The narrow-walled canyon provides some shade. Other than some minimal rock-scrambling, the terrain is pretty straightforward. The trail is generally marked well and while some other washes might at first seem a little confusing, the main route never strays outside of the canyon.

Junction on the Randall Henderson Trail, Palm Desert, CA

0:02 – Start of the loop (times are approximate)

After about half a mile on either trail, a short connector joins them. Both trails continue up canyon, reaching a T-junction just under a mile from the start. Here, you can shorten the hike by turning right if you came up the wash or left if you came along the ridge, and following the other route back to the trail head. However, if you want to extend the hike, head in the opposite direction (turn right if you came  along the ridge or left if from the wash). You reach a dirt road, where you’ll make a hairpin turn and head across the top of the canyon, enjoying some nice views of the eastern end of the San Jacintos. This stretch of road is 0.4 miles long and connects the two ends of the trail. Follow the single-track back into the canyon, either retracing the route you did earlier or taking the opposite one for variety.

Junction on the Randall Henderson Trail, Palm Desert, CA

0:18 – Junction at the top of the canyon; complete the loop by turning around or extend it by heading toward the dirt road

In case you were wondering, Randall Henderson (1888-1970) was a prominent member of the desert community, whose work as a writer and publisher helped build interest in the Coachella Valley. For more information on Henderson, click here.

Sunset from the Randall Henderson Trail, Palm Desert, CA

0:32 – Sunset as seen from the dirt road at the top of the loop

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Shoestring/Sandtrap/Limestone Ridge Loop (Limestone Canyon Regional Park)

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Old Saddleback seen from the Sandtrap Trail

Old Saddleback seen from the Sandtrap Trail

Oak on Limestone Canyon Road

Oak on Limestone Canyon Road

Shoestring/Sandtrap/Limestone Ridge Loop (Limestone Canyon Regional Park)

  • Location: Silverado, in the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains.  From the 55 Freeway, take the Chapman Ave. exit and head east for a total of 7.7 miles (Chapman becomes Santiago Canyon Road en route).    Shortly past Irvine Lake, look for the Augustine Staging Area, turn right and park as directed in the lot.  From I-5, take El Toro Road and head northeast for a total of 14.2 miles (El Toro becomes Santiago Canyon Road).  The Augustine Staging Area is on the left, 1.8 miles past Silverado Canyon Road.
  • Agency: Irvine Ranch Company; Orange County Parks & Recreation
  • Distance: 10.3 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,600 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (distance, elevation gain)
  • Suggested time: 4.5 hours
  • Best season:  September – June; accessible only during specific times (check Irvine Ranch Company link above for schedule)
  • USGS topo maps: “Santiago Peak”
  • Recommended gear: sunblock; sun hat
  • More information: Limestone Canyon info here; Everytrail report here; description of upcoming hike on Friday, December 5th here
  • Rating: 7
0:00 - Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This loop is a longer version of the popular Shoestring Loop in Limestone Canyon Wilderness Park.  Like the Shoestring, this hike can be done on Wilderness Access Days in Limestone Canyon or as part of one of several docent-led hikes scheduled through the year (it will be next offered on Friday, 11/14 and Friday, 12/5).  Click the Irvine Ranch Company link for available dates.  The full version described here is more than 10 miles long, but if you are hiking independently on a Wilderness Access Day, you can shorten the loop to just under 8 miles.  On the guided hikes, the volunteer docents may give the group the option of shortening the hike, but be prepared for the full route–almost all of which is exposed.

0:20 - Approaching the fire road from the Shoestring Trail (times are approximate, reflecting the pace of the Irvine Ranch Conservancy's hikes)

0:20 – Approaching the fire road from the Shoestring Trail (times are approximate, reflecting the pace of the Irvine Ranch Conservancy’s hikes)

Begin by heading toward the Hicks Haul Road.  Turn right and follow it for a short distance to the Shoestring Trail, a single-track.  Cross a wooden footbridge and follow the Shoestring Trail for about 0.7 miles as it parallels Santiago Canyon Road, making its way up and down a few short but steep hills.

0:41 - Morning mist on the Loma Ridge Jeep Trail

0:41 – Morning mist on the Loma Ridge Jeep Trail

At just under a mile from the start, turn left and begin an ascent on a fire road.  After about a mile of steady climbing, you reach the Loma Ridge Jeep Trail, where you get some good views to the southwest.  You follow this trail southeast for about 1.4 miles, making several more small ascents and descents, before reaching a junction with the paved Hicks Haul Road.  (This would be your return route on the 4.5 mile Shoestring Loop.)

1:12 - Right turn on the Hicks Haul Road toward East Loma Ridge

1:12 – Right turn on the Hicks Haul Road toward East Loma Ridge

To continue toward the Sandtrap Trail, bear right on the Hicks Haul Road and go a short distance to the East Loma Ridge Road.  It climbs for about a mile, taking in some excellent views in all directions, finally reaching a junction with the Sandtrap Trail.  Turn left and make a brief ascent to the highest point on the hike, just over 1,600 feet in elevation.  Enjoy some more views, which may extend to the San Gabriels if visibility is good, before beginning a steep descent.

1:33 - Looking north toward the San Gabriels from the start of the Sandtrap Trail

1:33 – Looking north toward the San Gabriels from the start of the Sandtrap Trail

The Sandtrap Trail follows a curving ridge that drops almost 700 feet in 1.4 miles.  At 6.3 miles, you reach a T-junction in oak-shaded Limestone Canyon.  If you want to end the hike here, turn left and follow Limestone Canyon Road about 1.4 miles back to the trailhead.  To extend the hike, turn right and follow the fire road up a gradual incline for a mile, enjoying a little bit of shade from sparsely spaced oaks and sycamores, to the Raptor Trail.

2:11 - Heading up Limestone Canyon Road at the bottom of the Sandtrap Trail

2:11 – Heading up Limestone Canyon Road at the bottom of the Sandtrap Trail

The single-track Raptor Trail crosses a footbridge and begins a rather steep climb, gaining 250 feet in half a mile.  At Limestone Ridge, turn left and follow the trail up and down some bumps, noting the characteristic sandstone geology of Black Star Canyon in the distance.  A steep descent brings you back into the canyon (9.2 miles from the start) where you bear right on Limestone Canyon Road and follow it just over a mile back to the parking lot.

2:40 - View from the top of the Raptor Trail, Limestone Ridge

2:40 – View from the top of the Raptor Trail, Limestone Ridge

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

3:10 - View of Black Star Canyon's geology before the descent back into Limestone Canyon

3:10 – View of Black Star Canyon’s geology before the descent back into Limestone Canyon