Cahuilla Mountain

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Looking north from just below Cahuilla Mountain's summit

Looking north from just below Cahuilla Mountain’s summit

Pines and manzanitas near Cahuilla Mountain's summit

Pines and manzanitas near Cahuilla Mountain’s summit

Cahuilla Mountain

    • Location: East of Temecula, south of the San Jacinto Mountains.  From I-15, take Highway 79 southeast for 17 miles to Highway 371.  Turn left and head northeast for 11.2 miles.  Shortly after the casino, turn left on Cary Road, signed for Cahuilla Mountain.  Follow the road 3.6 miles (it changes names several times, finally becoming Tripp Flats Road) and turn left on a dirt road, Forest Road 7S04.  The road is in fairly good shape, but there are a few bumps to watch for.  At 0.8 miles, turn left at an intersection and follow the road another 1.6 miles to the Cahuilla Mountain trail head, near some overhead power lines.  From Highway 74, take Highway 371 southwest for 9.5 miles to Cary Road and follow the directions above.  The GPS coordinates of the trailhead are N33 35.783, W116 46.823.  Although the trail is on San Bernardino National Forest land, at no point is any requirement of an Adventure Pass mentioned.
    • Agency: San Bernardino National Forest/Idyllwild Ranger Station
    • Distance: 6 miles
    • Elevation gain: 1,400 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (distance, elevation gain)
    • Suggested time: 3hours
    • Best season: October – June
    • USGS topo map: Cahuilla Mountain
    • Recommended gear: sun hat; insect repellentsunblock
    • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
    • More information: Forest Service page here; Trip description here; Everytrail report here; Sierra Club page here
    • Rating: 9
0:00 - Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This one may be a bit off the beaten path, but it’s well worth the trip.  Cahuilla Mountain stands between the Palomar and San Jacinto ranges, only a little over an hour’s drive from Riverside and Palm Springs, and doable as a day trip from San Diego, Orange County or L.A.  While it may appear to be located in a desert wasteland, the mountain’s high elevation (5,635 feet) helps it support a variety of trees and plants; with an early start and good sun protection, the trip can be done in the warm months.  The views, which include the San Bernardino, Santa Ana, San Jacinto, Santa Rosa and Palomar ranges, are great.    If you are approaching from the southwest via Highway 371, you will see the long ridge of the mountain from a good distance out.  The trail ends at the southern peak, probably the highest of several bumps on the ridge, although it has been speculated that another bump farther south may be a shade taller.

0:24 - View of the Santa Rosa Mountains and Anza Valley (times are approximate)

0:24 – View of the Santa Rosa Mountains and Anza Valley (times are approximate)

From the dirt lot, follow the trail past the information board and up the north slope of the mountain. You get some nice views of the San Jacintos and distant Santa Rosas, and the Anza Valley below. After traversing the rim of a deep canyon, you enter a pleasant woodland of pines and oaks at 1.4 miles, where you can sit and enjoy the shade. This is the approximate half way point.

0:42 - Looking back at Thomas Mountain as the trail enters woodland

0:42 – Looking back at Thomas Mountain as the trail enters woodland

The trail continues its ascent, reaching a scenic meadow and saddle at about two miles. Here, you can look back and get great views to the east, and the summit itself comes into view. The trail then descends onto the west slope of the mountain, providing great views of the Temecula Valley. After entering another grove of trees, you reach a junction at 2.5 miles. The right fork leads to a spring (marked by an actual metal spring) and the left fork leads to the summit.

1:00 - Looking east from the saddle

1:00 – Looking east from the saddle

The final ascent takes you through another meadow and past more trees before arriving at the summit ridge. You get a great view first to the south and then to the north before climbing to the top. The trees prevent the summit from being a true 360-degree view, but you can still get some impressive vistas in all directions.

1:02 - Descending into the woodlands past the saddle

1:02 – Descending into the woodlands past the saddle

In case you were wondering, the mountain’s name, like that of the local tribe, is pronounced “ka-WEE-uh.”  The mountain is also notable for the historical events that took place around it, which inspired the famous 19th century novel “Ramona.”

1:15 - The spring (turn left)

1:15 – The spring (turn left)

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

1:30 - Looking south from the summit

1:30 – Looking south from the summit


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