Michael Antonovich Regional Park at Joughin Ranch

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View of the Santa Susana Mountains from Michael Antonovich Regional Park, San Fernando Valley, CA

Looking west from the fire road, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Oak woodlands, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Oaks in a tributary of Brown’s Canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Michael Antonovich Regional Park at Joughin Ranch

  • Location: Santa Susana Mountains north of Chatsworth.  From the 118 Freeway, take the DeSoto Ave. exit.  Head north (turn left if you’re coming from the west, right if from the east) a short distance to the end of DeSoto and turn right on Browns Canyon Road, following the signs for Michael Antonovich Regional Park (not to be confused with nearby Michael Antonovich Open Space or the Michael Antonovich Recreational Trail in San Dimas.)  Follow Browns Canyon Road for 1.2 miles to a small turnout on the left side of the road, marked with a green Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy sign.
  • Agency: Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy/Michael Antonovich Regional Park
  • Distance: 3.3 miles
  • Elevation gain: 500 feet
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Difficulty rating: PG
  • Best season:  September – May
  • USGS topo map: “Oat Mountain”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock
  • More information: Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 5
Michael Antonovich Regional Park trail head

0:00 – Trail head on Brown’s Canyon Road (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This park’s name may be a mouthful, but it helps distinguish it from the nearby Michael Antonovich Open Space and the Michael Antonovich Trail of San Dimas. This loop explores the lower area of the regional park, which is also home to Oat Mountain.

Trail junction, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:10 – Hard left at the four-way junction (times are approximate)

From the parking area, follow the paved road uphill for about 0.4 miles to a four-way junction. This is the start of the loop, which can be hiked in either direction. Hiking it clockwise, as described below, allows you to visit the most scenic part last. The trail on your right leads to a dead end; the vague looking path straight ahead is your return route. Take a hard left and continue climbing uphill. The trail soon becomes a single-track and arrives at a flat.

Single track trail leading into a canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:16 – Follow the single track at the junction

Look for a narrow path heading straight ahead into the canyon. You climb for about 0.3 miles more up the steep and sometimes claustrophobic trail, finally reaching a fire road, listed on some maps as the Curacao Trail, about a mile from the start.

View from the hills above Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:25 – View from the fire road at the top of the ascent (head right)

Turn right and follow the trail along a ridge. The landscape is dominated by Rocky Peak to the west and Oat Mountain to the north; on the way you get aerial views of Browns Canyon and Ybarra Canyon.

After an undulating mile along the ridge, look for a narrow single-track on the right, heading back into the canyon. (Shortly beyond this point, the fire road is blocked by private property). The trail drops, steeply at first, into the tributary of Brown’s Canyon, leveling out at the bottom, making its way in and out of pockets of oaks. At about 2.6 miles, note the curious presence of a solitary pine tree.

Descending into the canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:50 – Right turn to descend into the canyon

Shortly beyond the pine, the trail widens into a semblance of a fire road before returning to the intersection, completing the loop. Retrace your steps down the hill back to the parking area on Browns Canyon Road.

Pine tree, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

1:05 – Lone pine in the canyon

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

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Warner Springs to Eagle Rock via Pacific Crest Trail

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Eagle Rock, northeast San Diego County

Appropriately named Eagle Rock

Panorama from the Pacific Crest Trail, northeast San Diego County

Lone tree on the Pacific Crest Trail on the way back from Eagle Rock

Warner Springs to Eagle Rock via Pacific Crest Trail

  • Location: Across from Cal Fire Station 52, 31049 Highway 79, Warner Springs. The location is 38.7 miles east of Interstate 15, 6.8 miles north of Highway 76 and 13.8 miles north of Highway 78. Park in the narrow dirt turnout across from the fire station by the Pacific Crest Trail decal.
  • Agency: Cleveland National Forest/Palomar Ranger District
  • Distance: 6.6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 700 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Best season: October – June
  • USGS topo map: Warner Springs
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; insect repellent
  • More information: Trip descriptions here and here
  • Rating: 8
Pacific Crest Trail head on highway 79, San Diego County

0:00 – Trail head on Highway 79 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Everything enjoyable about inland San Diego County hiking can be found on this stretch of the Pacific Crest Trail. The destination is Eagle Rock, 3.3 miles from Warner Springs, but even just a short stroll is worthwhile. Scenic highlights include geology, open fields, shaded canyons and a who’s who of San Diego mountains.

Fence on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:10 – Gate before the junction with the CR&H Trail (Times are approximate)

From the turnout across from the fire station, carefully cross Highway 79 and enter the metal gate, signed as a Pacific Crest Trail access point. It drops down to a stream bed and heads east, passing the fire station and school before reaching another gate and a junction with the California Riding & Hiking Trail. The CR&H Trail heads left; the P.C.T. heads straight, entering an attractive canyon filled with oaks, sycamores and willows.

Oak woodlands, Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:27 – Woodlands on the Pacific Crest Trail

You follow the P.C.T. generally east for a very pleasant mile plus, weaving in and out of woodlands, before emerging at a meadow. Here, you can see Hot Springs Mountain, the tallest point in San Diego County, dominating the landscape to the north. You begin climbing, reaching the top of a ridge at about 2 miles from the start. On the way up, keep an eye out for the Palomar Mountain Observatory perched high on the hills to the west, resembling a golf ball.

Meadow and mountains on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County, CA

0:37 – Meadow with distant mountains

On the opposite side of the ridge, the landscape becomes more desert-like, with manzanita trees and even a few cholla and prickly pear cacti. You gradually descend into a valley, taking in views of the Vulcan Mountains on the way and then make another climb to a saddle, where you can see Eagle Rock in the distance. The P.C.T. makes another descent before climbing gradually to a spur leading to the giant granite formation.

View from the top of a ridge on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:47- View from the top of the ridge

From the back side, Eagle Rock’s resemblance to its namesake is quite striking. In addition, the views in all directions are outstanding, making this a perfect spot to sit and enjoy some solitude before heading back.

Manzanita on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County, CA

0:51 – Manzanita on the Pacific Crest Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

View from Eagle Rock, San Diego County, CA

1:20 – View from Eagle Rock

Horsethief Creek via Cactus Springs Trail

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Cottowoods at Horsethief Creek, Santa Rosa Mountains

Cottonwoods above Horsethief Creek

View on the Cactus Springs Trail, Santa Rosa Mountains

Desert vegetation and clouds, Cactus Springs Trail

Horsethief Creek via Cactus Springs Trail

  • Location: Santa Rosa Mountains on Highway 74, 15.5 miles southwest of Highway 111, 8.8 miles east of Highway 371 and 21.2 miles southeast of Highway 243. Look for the Cactus Springs Trailhead sign and head south (turn right if you’re coming from the west or left if you’re coming from Palm Springs) onto Pinyon Flats Transfer Station Road. Follow it a short distance to the Cactus Springs Trail Head parking lot, on the left.
  • Agency: Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument
  • Distance: 4.8 miles
  • Elevation gain: 900 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
  • Best season:  November – April
  • USGS topo map: “Toro Peak”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; hiking poles
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
  • More information: here; plant guide here; trip descriptions here and here (includes additional distance past Horsethief Creek)
  • Rating: 8
Cactus Springs Trail Head en route to Horsethief Creek, Santa Rosa Mountains

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Set in the transitional zone between the Santa Rosa Mountains and the Coachella Valley, this hike provides a huge variety of scenery, including geology, canyons, creeks and desert flora. Adding to the appeal is the area’s historical interest; Horsethief Creek takes its name from the legend of gangsters that supposedly used the canyon as a hideout.

Cactus Springs Trail, Santa Rosa Mountains

0:05 – Information board; Cactus Springs Trail leaves Sawmill Road (times are approximate)

The hike follows the upper portion of the 22-mile Cactus Springs Trail, also signed as 5E01, which continues through the Santa Rosa Wilderness and descends into the Coachella Valley. From the parking area, follow the rightmost of the two trails, reaching a junction with the dirt Sawmill Road, which begins its long ascent toward Santa Rosa Mountain. Bear left onto the Cactus Springs Trail, passing by an information board and trail register.

Cactus Springs Trail crosses Deep Creek, Santa Rosa Mountains

0:14 – Crossing the Deep Creek stream bed

Continue eastward through a landscape of pinyon pines, agave and cacti, with Asbestos Mountain towering to the north. At half a mile, trail drops toward the headwaters of Deep Creek, climbs up the other side and passes an abandoned dolomite mine. The trail makes a few ups and downs, reaching a sign indicating the entrance to the Santa Rosa Wilderness at about 1.2 miles, the approximate halfway point.

Sign at the entrance to the Santa Rosa Wilderness, Cactus Springs Trail

0:31 – Entering the Santa Rosa Wilderness

Past the sign, you descend through an attractive valley dotted with cacti and other flora to another tributary of Deep Creek and then climb to a saddle (1.8 miles) with a panoramic view of Horsethief Canyon. Soon after you’ll notice the cottonwoods lining the bottom of the canyon and the trail makes a steep descent, negotiating switchbacks to arrive at the creek.

Descending to Horsethief Creek on the Cactus Springs Trail, Santa Rosa Mountains

0:54 – Beginning the descent to Horsethief Creek, about 1.8 miles from the start

On the opposite side of the stream, which may be dry late in the year, a short spur leads to a flat area beneath a grove of cottonwoods, the turnaround point. Here you can sit and relax before making the steep climb out of the canyon.

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Cottonwoods in Horsethief Creek, Santa Rosa Mountains

1:10 – Cottonwoods at Horsethief Creek

Knapp’s Castle

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View from Knapp's Castle, Santa Barbara, Los Padres National Forest

Looking northwest from Knapp’s Castle

View of the Los Padres National Forest, Santa Barbara, CA from Knapp's Castle

Looking northeast from Knapp’s Castle

Knapp’s Castle

    • Location: Los Padres National Forest north of Santa Barbara. From Highway 101, head north on Highway 154 for 7.8 miles.  Make a hard right on East Camino Cielo and follow it 3 miles (0.9 miles past Painted Cave Road). Park in dirt turnouts on either side of the road.
    • Agency: Los Padres National Forest/Santa Barbara Ranger District
    • Distance: 0.8 mile
    • Elevation gain: 100 feet
    • Suggested time: 30 minutes
    • Difficulty rating: G
    • Best season: Year round
    • USGS topo map: San Marcos Pass
    • Recommended guidebook: Day Hikes Around Santa Barbara
    • More information: Trip descriptions here, here and here; Yelp page here
    • Rating: 7
View of the Santa Ynez Valley, Los Padres National Forest, Knapp's Castle trail head

0:00 – View from the trail head on East Camino Cielo (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Excellent views and historic ruins for very little effort (unless you use the more challenging Snyder Trail) make this understandably one of the most popular hikes in the Santa Barbara area. The hike is on private land but as of this writing, the public is allowed access by the grace of the owners.

The original owner was George Knapp, who completed his mansion in 1920. Unfortunately, like its counterpart in the Santa Monica Mountains the Tropical Terrace, the mansion fell victim to fire; the Paradise Canyon Fire of 1940 to be precise.

On the trail to Knapp's Castle, Los Padres National Forest

0:08 – Junction with the Snyder Trail; stay right (times are approximate)

The hike to reach the mansion could hardly be simpler. From East Camino Cielo, follow the dirt road downhill, taking in outstanding views of the Santa Ynez Valley the entire way. At about 0.3 miles, stay right as the Snyder Trail heads left and downhill toward Paradise Road, almost 2,000 feet below. Pass a fence and follow the trail to the ruins of the house.

Here you can enjoy a 270-degree panorama. Stone arches that were once windows frame the landscape; the old chimney still stands in the midst of a small oak grove. After taking it all in, retrace your steps or, if you’ve left a car a the bottom of the Snyder Trail, you can continue downhill for a point-to-point hike.

Ruins of Knapp's Castle, Los Padres National Forest, Santa Barbara

0:11 – Chimney among the ruins of Knapp’s Castle

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.


Mountain Home Flats

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Canyon of Mountain Home Creek in the San Beranrdino National Forest

Panoramic view of the canyon carved by Mountain Home Creek

Sunlight through the pines, Mountain Home Flats Trail Camp

Sunlight through the pines, Mountain Home Flats Trail Camp

Mountain Home Flats

  • Location: San Bernardino National Forest. The trail head is located by mile marker 18.45 and the coordinates are N 34 07.632, W 116 59.017 but the only practical parking area is a quarter mile north, across the bridge at a turnout on the right side of Highway 38, about 18 miles northeast of Redlands and 3.4 miles north of the hairpin turn at the intersection with Valley of the Falls Drive. While no signage indicates that a National Forest Service Adventure Pass is necessary for parking, many trail heads in the San Bernardino National Forest do require the pass. If you do not have the pass and want to be safe, click here to purchase. The pass can also be bought at the Mill Creek Ranger Station.
  • Agency:  San Bernardino National Forest/Mill Creek Ranger Station
  • Distance:  4 miles
  • Elevation gain:  1,200 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Trail condition, navigation, terrain, steepness, elevation gain, altitude)
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Best season: April – November
  • Recommended gear: insect repellent; hiking poles; long sleeved shirt and pants
  • Recommended guidebook: San Gorgonio Wilderness Map (Tom Harrison Maps); Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
  • USGS topo map: Big Bear Lake
  • More information: Trail maps here and here; video shot at the trail camp here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 7
0:00 - Start of the hike, a quarter mile north on Highway 38 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Start of the hike, a quarter mile north on Highway 38 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Though it’s relatively close to civilization as the crow flies, the Mountain Home Flats Trail Camp feels very remote, accessible by an unmaintained trail leading into the wilderness from a hard-to-find trail head. In an only four mile round trip assuming a start from the turnout a quarter mile above the trail head) this hike presents multiple challenges, including navigation, negotiating fallen trees, difficult terrain and steep ascents. The bugs can be annoying as well.

Begining of the Mountain Home Flats Trail, San Bernardino National Forest, CA

0:07 – Start of the Mountain Home Flats Trail (times are approximate)

Despite these drawbacks, the hike is still a worthwhile experience, especially for those who want to enjoy the San Gorgonio Wilderness without having to tackle some of the more intimidating peaks in the area. Highlights of this trip include the peaceful destination of Mountain Home Flat, panoramic views of Mountain Home Creek, black oaks, pines and more.

Following the creek bed on the Mountain Home Flats Trail

0:17 – The trail drops to the creek and follows for a short distance

Assuming you start from the turnout, follow south on Highway 38 for a quarter mile. This is easier said than done: the shoulder of the road is narrow and becomes nonexistent at the bridge over Glen Martin Creek. Your safest bet is to stay outside the fence separating the road and pick your way through the vegetation, which tends not to be too thick.

Following a tributary canyon of Glen Martin Creek, San Bernardino National Forest

0:22 – Bear right at the tributary and leave Glen Martin Creek

At a quarter mile, you reach the beginning of the trail. The first half mile is fairly easy going, save for a few fallen tree trunks and one slightly difficult stretch that has been washed out. The trail dips down to the streambed of Glen Martin Creek (dry as of this writing) and briefly follows the north side before reaching a junction. Bear right, leaving the main stream bed for a tributary and head up canyon, negotiating more fallen tree trunks. Soon you come to another junction where you again stay right, continuing to follow the stream bed.

Fallen logs in the San Bernardino National Forest

0:24 – Climbing logs on the tributary of Glen Martin Creek

At about a mile from the start of the hike (3/4 of a mile on the trail), leave the stream bed by heading right, climbing over a fallen log and climbing through an attractive grove of black oaks. The trail then makes a hairpin right turn and engages in a steep series of switchbacks.

Leaving the canyon, heading toward Mountain Home Flats, San Bernardino National Forest

0:32 – Leaving the tributary of Glen Martin Creek

After huffing and puffing, you attain a ridge and are treated to an excellent view of the canyon carved by Mountain Home Creek. Your work, however, is not done: the trail now clings tightly to the north side of the canyon, often quite loose and washed out. A particularly tricky spot shortly after the ridge requires special attention; expect to use your hands as well as your feet. Shortly beyond, the trail makes an easy-to-miss “S” curve to the left before beginning its descent to Mountain Home Creek. Again, take extra care when negotiating the washed-out sections of the trail.

0:36 - View from the ridge, looking down into the canyon of Mountain Home Creek

0:41 – View from the ridge, looking down into the canyon of Mountain Home Creek

On the south side of Mountain Home Creek, the trail begins a series of switchbacks. The lower portion of the trail is somewhat loose. Keep an eye out for metal poles that once were part of a retaining wall but now unfortunately present tripping hazards. As you climb steeply up the south side of the canyon, the trail becomes more solid. After the sharp ascent, the trail levels out and finally reaches the destination, Mountain Home Flats trail camp.

Difficult stretch of the Mountain Home Flats Trail, San Bernardino National Forest

0:47 – Difficult stretch of the trail on the descent to Mountain Home Creek

Here, you can sit on a log beneath the shade of pines and oaks, charging your batteries for the steep descent back to Mountain Home Creek and the precarious cliff-hugging that awaits you on the return. The GPS coordinates of the trail camp are N 34 07.726, W 116 57.674 and the elevation is 6,373 feet.

Crossing Mountain Home Creek, San Bernardino National Forest

1:02 – Crossing Mountain Home Creek

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Mountain Home Flats Trail Camp, San Bernardino National Forest

1:25 – Mountain Home Flats Trail Camp

Mt. Wilson/Devore Camp Loop

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View from near the top of the Rim Trail, Mt. Wilson

View from near the top of the Rim Trail, Mt. Wilson

Stream crossing in the Angeles National Forest

Stream crossing on the Gabrielino Trail between West Fork and Devore Camps

Mt. Wilson/Devore Camp Loop

  • Location:  Just below the summit of Mt. Wilson.  From I-210, follow Highway 2 (the Angeles Crest Highway) northeast for 14 miles to Mt. Wilson/Red Box Road.  Turn right and follow Mt. Wilson/Red Box Road 4.2 miles.  Legally, you are required to turn right on Mt. Wilson Circle (a one-way street) and follow it 0.6 miles as it circles the antennas before arriving back at Mt. Wilson/Red Box Road and the signed Kenyon Devore Trail Head.  Several parking spots are designated on the left side of the road.  If parking is unavailable here, you can park farther up at the large lot below the Cosmic Cafe and start the loop from there.  A National Forest Service adventure pass ($5 for a day or $30 for the year) is required. Click here to purchase.
  • Agency: Angeles National Forest, Los Angeles River District
  • Distance: 11.5  miles
  • Elevation gain: 2,900 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: R (Distance, elevation gain, trail condition, terrain, navigation)
  • Suggested time: 6.5 hours
  • Best season: Year-round, depending on conditions (hot during the summer, potentially treacherous after rain, possible snow during the winter)
  • USGS topo map: “Mt. Wilson”
  • Recommended gear: Hiking Poles; Insect Repellent; long sleeved shirts and pants
  • Recommended guidebook: Trails of the Angeles
  • More information: Trip reports here and here
  • Rating: 8
Kenyon Devore Trail Head, Mt. Wilson

0:00 – Kenyon Devore Trail Head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This loop offers a different perspective on Mt. Wilson from the approaches from Chantry Flat, Sierra Madre and Altadena.  Starting from just off of the summit, the hike drops down to the West Fork of the San Gabriel River via the Kenyon Devore and Gabrielino Trails and returns via the Gabrielino and Rim Trails, creating a prime example of a “reverse hike.”  Although the elevation gain isn’t as big as the hikes from below, terrain and sometimes navigation add to the challenges.  Many sections of the trails have been washed out, requiring extra caution, and the stretch between the two trail camps requires multiple potentially tricky stream crossings.  You will also need to keep an eye out for poison oak and poodle dog bush.  Despite these difficulties, this hike is a very enjoyable one, exploring some of the lightly traveled country of the San Gabriels and providing an excellent workout.  Adding to the appeal is the fact that the majority of the route is shaded.

Rope to help cross a creek, Angeles National Forest

0:45 – Rope to help navigate a creek crossing on the Kenyon Devore Trail (times are approximate)

From the Kenyon Devore trailhead, follow the trail downhill, heading generally north.  There are a few sudden switchbacks that may be easy to miss; keep in mind that if the navigation and terrain become too difficult, you have probably lost the trail and should back track.  You follow the contour of Strayns Canyon and as you descend the pines and black oaks give way to alders and maples.  There are a few spots where fallen trees can make the route a little bit obscure, but it never strays too far from the canyon.

1:12 - Bear right on the Gabrielino Trail

1:20 – Bear right on the Gabrielino Trail

At about 2.8 miles, bear right on the Gabrielino Trail.  Follow it into a meadow where you will see Mt. Baldy and its neighbors to the east.  The going is fairly easy, although you will want to keep an eye out for poodle dog, which grows in abundance during this stretch.  The trail leaves the meadow and heads back into the shade for a little bit before dropping down to the West Fork Trail Camp (4.2 miles.)  Just before reaching the camp, you’ll make a tricky hairpin turn to the left–not helped by the fact that the trail has been washed out, likely requiring use of hands as well as feet–and that there’s a fair amount of poison oak.

West Fork Trail Camp

2:10 – West Fork Trail Camp

From West Fork, look for the sign indicating the continuation of the Gabrielino Trail.  You cross the stream bed and follow the trail farther down the canyon of the West Fork.  Although there’s not much elevation change here, this is one of the tougher parts of the hike: much of the trail becomes over grown and the spots where the trail crosses the stream aren’t always obvious.  Expect to do a little bit of bushwhacking.  After several crossings, the trail rises to the north side of the canyon, staying above for a little while before dropping back down.  One final stream crossing brings you to the Devore Trail Camp (5.5 miles.)  Here you can sit at a picnic table and rest up for the major ascent that now awaits you.

Bushwhacking deep in the Angeles National Forest

2:20 – Bushwhacking after the first creek crossing past West Fork Trail Camp on the Gabrielino Trail

Continue southeast on the Gabrielino Trail which rises quite steeply at first and maintains a steady incline for the next mile, when it climbs about 900 feet to cross Rincon Red Box Road.  On the opposite side, switchbacks bring you up another 400 feet in half a mile to reach a junction called Newcomb Pass (7 miles from the start.)  Here you can sit at another picnic table and relax before starting the final leg of the hike.

Stream crossing in the Angeles National Forest before Devore Trail Camp

2:55 – Another stream crossing, shortly before Devore Trail Camp

Follow the Rim Trail, which climbs more gradually, heading west toward Mt. Wilson.  On the way, you get some nice glimpses of the Angeles National Forest to the north and as you climb higher, you can see the San Gabriel Valley to the south; if visibility is good you can see Old Saddleback.  Other than a few short open stretches, the Rim Trail is shaded, mainly by black oaks.

Devore Trail Camp

3:10 – Devore Trail Camp

The incline becomes a little more noticeable as you near Mt. Wilson.  As you climb you’ll spot antennas between the trees.  At about 10 miles, you’ll see the first of several golf ball-shaped telescopes.  The Rim Trail skirts along the north side of the broad Mt. Wilson summit, finally reaching the paved road at 10.6 miles from the start.  Bear right and follow the road to the large parking area by the Cosmic Cafe, where you can get your best view of the hike from a picnic table.  Though it’s not a 360-degree panorama, pending good visibility, you can see Catalina Island, the Santa Monica Mountains, downtown L.A. and more.  (If you have time and energy, you can walk up to the observatory for an even better view.)

Newcomb Pass, Angeles National Forest

4:00 – Newcomb Pass

From the parking lot, follow the paved road just over half a mile back to the Kenyon Devore trailhead.  If you were wondering, Kenyon Devore (1911-1995) was a former L.A. County employee and Angeles National Forest volunteer.

North view from the Rim Trail, Angeles National Forest

5:10 – Looking north from the Rim Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Skyline Park, Mt. Wilson

6:15 – View from Skyline Park, summit of Mt. Wilson

Sunset Hills/Woodridge Loop

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Through the meadow on the Woodridge Loop

Through the meadow on the Woodridge Loop

Morning view of Bard Lake, Sunset Hills/Woodridge Loop

Morning view of Bard Lake, Sunset Hills/Woodridge Loop

Sunset Hills/Woodridge Loop

  • Location: Erbes Road, Thousand Oaks. From the south, take the 23 Freeway to Sunset Hills Blvd.  Turn right and go 0.2 miles to Erbes Road.  Turn left and go 0.7 miles and park in a large dirt lot on the left side of the road (if you reach the freeway, you’ve gone too far).  From the north, take the 23 Freeway to Olsen Road.  Turn right and go 0.4 miles to Erbes Road.  Turn left and go 0.7 miles to the trail head, which will be on the left side of the road shortly after you cross under the freeway.
  • Agency: Conejo Recreation and Parks District/Conejo Open Space Foundation
  • Distance: 5.7 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,000 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Distance, elevation gain)
  • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
  • Best season: October – May
  • USGS topo map:  Newbury Park
  • Recommended gear: sun hathiking poles; insect repellent
  • More information: Area trail map here; trip description here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 5
0:00 - Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This loop isn’t as scenically varied or secluded as some of the other hikes in the Lang Ranch area, but it does offer a good workout, conveniently located to the Thousand Oaks/Simi Valley area.  On clear days, the vistas include the Santa Monica Mountains, Santa Susanas, Simi Hills and more.

0:26 - "Y" Junction near the top of the ridge; bear left (times are approximate)

0:28 – “Y” Junction near the top of the ridge; bear left (times are approximate)

From the trailhead on Erbes Road, follow the switchbacks up the ridge.  After a quarter mile, a trail branches off to the left, heading downhill; this is the start of a small loop that can be added to the hike.  Continuing uphill on the main route you pass the other end of the loop and the trail then bends right, heading southeast.  You get a good view of Bard Lake (also known as Wood Ranch Reservoir) on the left and the Santa Monica Mountains on the right.

0:35 - Beginning of the loop

0:35 – Beginning of the loop

After briefly leveling out, the trail runs up along side a fence and makes a steep ascent, climbing over 200 feet in about 0.3 miles.  Bear left at a Y-junction on the way up.  At the top of the ascent (1.1 miles from the start) you can enjoy a 360-degree view before descending.

1:00 - Cross the road and continue on the paved trail opposite

1:00 – Cross the road and continue on the paved trail opposite

At 1.4 miles, you reach a T-junction; the start of the main loop.  It can be hiked in either direction; by going counter-clockwise as described here, the ascents are slightly more gradual.  Take a hard right and descend to residential Sunset Hills Blvd.  Cross the street and turn right, following it briefly to a parking area where the trail continues (1.8 miles.)

1:12 - End of the pavement; bear left

1:12 – End of the pavement; bear left

This brings you to one of the more attractive legs of the hike.  You ascend to a meadow with panoramic views, heading first south then east, meeting up with a service road at 2.5 miles.  Cross it and continue east, now on a paved path that leads around the backs of some homes.  When the paved path ends, bear left and head into a field.  On the opposite hill, you may notice hikers descending on the Lang Ranch Loop.

1:20 - Left turn; heading uphill toward the saddle

1:20 – Left turn; heading uphill toward the saddle

At an intersection, head left and uphill (the right fork takes you to Lang Ranch, an option if you want to extend the hike.) A short climb brings you to a saddle where two oaks stand on opposite sides of the trail.  A paved road descends; you can use it, but to make the hike more interesting, follow a trail on the right side of the road, which briefly climbs before making a twisting descent, taking in some good views of Simi Valley, soon rejoining the road.  (A few trails branch off to the right; they head toward the Long Canyon area of Simi Valley.)

1:23 - Oak tree at the top of the saddle (bear right on the single-track)

1:23 – Oak tree at the top of the saddle (bear right on the single-track)

After crossing the road (3.3 miles), pick up the trail on the opposite side, passing by some sandstone boulders.  The trail climbs gradually, following a ridge in back of some homes, before completing the loop (4.3 miles.)  Retrace your steps back to the trail head on Erbes, enjoying some good views to the north and west.

1:25 - Sandstone boulders on the opposite side of the service road

1:25 – Sandstone boulders on the opposite side of the service road

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

1:50 - Heading back along the ridge, completing the loop

1:50 – Heading back along the ridge, completing the loop