Cedar Creek Falls (West Approach)

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Cedar Creek Falls, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

Cedar Creek Falls

Eagle Peak seen from the San Diego River Gorge Trail, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

Eagle Peak from the San Diego River Gorge Trail

Cedar Creek Falls (West Approach)

  • Location: 15519 Thornbush Road, Ramona. From Escondido, follow Highway 78 east for about 18 miles. In downtown Ramona when Highway 78 turns left, stay straight and follow 10th St., which soon becomes San Vicente Road, for a total of 6.8 miles. Turn left on Ramona Oaks and follow it 2.9 miles to Thornbush Road. Turn right on Thornbush and follow it 0.2 miles to the parking area. From Poway, take Highway 67 to Dye Road (6.1 miles northeast of the junction with Poway Road). Turn right and follow Dye 1.8 miles where it turns left and becomes Ramona St. Follow Ramona 0.4 miles and turn right on Warnock. Go 0.8 miles and turn right on San Vicente. Follow San Vicente Road 4.8 miles to Ramona Oaks. Turn left and follow Ramona Oaks 2.9 miles to Thornbush. Turn right and drive to the parking area. Restrooms and water are available at the trail head. Dogs are allowed but not recommended. To purchase the required permit ($6 for a group of up to five) click here. If you have a Smartphone, you can buy the permit at the trail head but plan on 10-15 minutes’ processing time. Note that the permit is only required for visiting the area around the falls; the first two miles of the hike don’t require it.
  • Agency: Cleveland National Forest/Palomar Ranger District
  • Distance: 5.4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,050 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Elevation gain, distance)
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Best season: November – June; sunrise to sunset
  • USGS topo map: “Santa Ysabel”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; hiking poles
  • More information: Yelp page here; trip descriptions here and here; articles about the history of the trail and its current regulations here and here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 8

The good news is that the San Diego River Gorge Trail provides a route to Cedar Creek Falls that is more convenient and accessible than the trail from south of Julian. The bad news is that over use and reckless behavior from some visitors has caused the implementation of a permit system. In addition to seeing its share of cliff-jumping type accidents, Cedar Creek Falls is a reverse hike through almost entirely exposed terrain in an area that gets very hot during the summer. Hikers who aren’t prepared for a long ascent can find themselves hating life on the return from Cedar Creek (the approaches from both directions are reverse hikes.)

Information board at the Cedar Creek Falls Trail Head, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

0:00 – Info board at the trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Despite the caveats, the scenic rewards of this hike are considerable. Even if the waterfall is barely a trickle, which is the case as of this writing, this is still one of the better hikes in San Diego County. The trail from Ramona is moderately graded and easy to follow.

Descending switchbacks on the San Diego River Gorge Trail, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

0:18 – Descending the switchbacks (times are approximate)

From the trail head, pass by an information board with dire warnings about heat stroke and and other potential hazards and begin the descent. As you make your way down the wide switchbacks, you get a panoramic view of the San Diego River Gorge below, with Eagle Peak towering above on the opposite side. Beyond are the higher summits of the Cuyamacas. You may also notice the trail from the east cutting its way down the hill side. Distance markers at quarter-mile intervals mark your progress.

At just over two miles, you reach the attractive floodplain of the San Diego River, dotted with oaks and sycamores. Almost immediately after you come to a junction with the trail from Julian. It is only beyond this point that the permit is required. Stay straight and follow the canyon of Cedar Creek, crossing the stream bed a few times. The trail becomes somewhat rocky but never too difficult.

Trees and mountains on the San Diego River Gorge Trail, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

0:25 – Change in the foliage as the trail descends

At about 2.7 miles from the start, the top of the 80-foot waterfall comes into view. You find yourself at a large pool nicknamed the Punchbowl, lined with rocks and a few shallow inlets. Here you can sit and enjoy the scene; though it’s only a few air miles from civilization it feels far more isolated. Make sure you rest up for the ascent back.

San Diego River Flood Plain, Cleveland National Forest, CA

0:50 – Greenery on the San Diego River flood plain, shortly before the junction

Text and photography copyright 2015 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Punchbowl, Cedar Creek Falls, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, CA

1:05 – Punchbowl at Cedar Creek Falls

Top 14 hikes of ’14!

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View of San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak from Ryan Mountain, Joshua Tree National Park

San Jacinto and San Gorgonio from Ryan Mountain

View of Millard Canyon from the Cape of Good Hope, Mt. Lowe Railway Loop

View of Millard Canyon from the Cape of Good Hope, Mt. Lowe Railway Loop

Trees at Horsethief Creek, Santa Rosa Wilderness

Trees at Horsethief Creek, Santa Rosa Wilderness

View of the coastline of Santa Cruz Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

Looking east from mid Santa Cruz Island en route to Del Norte Trail Camp

Greetings readers and hikers, I hope this has been a happy, fun and successful year for you all! As is tradition on this site, for the last post of the year we present a list of the highlights from the last 365 days. It was a banner year for NHLA – we passed one million total page views, set a single-day record for traffic, started a relationship with Sports Chalet, continued to network with other sites and publishers promoting hiking, such as the “Longest Straw” crew. More than one hundred hikes – from Santa Barbara to the high desert to Joshua Tree to the Anza-Borrego Desert – were written up and here are the best of them. Enjoy!

#14) Devil’s Punchbowl

Definitely one of the best short hikes in all of Southern California, the Devil’s Punchbowl showcases unusual geology, panoramic views of the high desert and the towering north slope of the San Gabriel Mountains.

#13) Rattlesnake Canyon

Steep but scenic, this is one of Santa Barbara’s most popular hiking trails. Your efforts for 1,700 feet of climbing are rewarded with outstanding ocean and mountain views.

#12) Butler Peak

Home to the highest lookout tower in the San Bernardino National Forest, the hike to Butler Peak leads through lofty pine forests with views all around.

#11) Santa Ysabel Open Space Preserve

It’s hard not to like the little mountain town of Julian. Case in point: this large pocket of open space, where you can lose yourself in the wide open fields and rolling hills.

#10) Romero Canyon

Excellent ocean vistas, mountain views and shaded oak woodlands are among the highlights of this popular Santa Barbara hike.

#9) West Mesa Loop

Alpine meadows, oak and pine forests, excellent mountain views and the historic Airplane Monument make this hike one of the best in all of Cuyamaca Rancho State Park.

#8) Horsethief Creek

In the dry transition zone between the Coachella Valley and the Santa Rosa Mountains, Horsethief Creek is a pleasant surprise, offering a truly remote hiking experience and a variety of geological and botanical scenery.

#7) Del Norte Trail Camp

Want to escape the crowds on Santa Cruz Island? The middle portion of this largest of the Channel Islands is lightly traveled and Del Norte Trail Camp is a perfect day hike destination (or, as its name suggests, a camping destination).

#6) Agua Tibia Wilderness

This remote and rugged area of north San Diego County challenges hikers but also rewards them with excellent views of the Palomar Mountains, the Santa Rosas, Garner Valley and more.

#5) Mt. Wilson/Devore Camp Loop

Mt. Wilson as a reverse hike? Why not? This 11-mile loop descends via the Kenyon Devore Trail and returns via the Gabrielino and Rim Trails, providing passage through Mt. Wilson’s remote north slope.

#4) Ryan Mountain

With 360-degree summit views including San Gorgonio and San Jacinto Mountain, there’s a reason why Ryan Mountain is Joshua Tree’s most popular summit

#3) Mt. Lowe Railway Loop

History and phenomenal views come together in this hike, which explores the route of the Mt. Lowe Railroad. The Sam Merrill and Echo Mountain Trails provide vistas of the L.A. Basin while the Castle Canyon Trail explores some of the area’s geological features. In between is Inspiration Point, where almost all of So Cal is visible.

#2) High Point

The highest point in the Palomar Mountains offers predictably exciting scenery. Supposedly a fire 200 miles away in Santa Barbara was once spotted from this lookout and when you experience the views from the summit, it’s not hard to believe.

#1) Mt. Hawkins Loop

The best NHLA hike of 2014 is this outstanding 13-mile loop in the Angeles National Forest. Visiting both South Hawkins and Mt. Hawkins, this epic route provides amazing views of the L.A. Basin, the high desert, San Gabriel Canyon and more.

Well, it’s been a great year and thank all of you readers for making this site your go-to resource for information about hikes. Let’s all get out there and have a great 2015!

Mt. Lowe Railway Loop

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Descending the Castle Canyon Trail from Inspiration Point

Descending the Castle Canyon Trail from Inspiration Point

Sun through the trees on the Castle Canyon Trail

Sun through the trees on the Castle Canyon Trail

Mt. Lowe Railway Loop

  • Location: Altadena (North of Pasadena), on the corner of Lake Avenue and Loma Alta Drive.  From I-210 in Pasadena, take the Lake Avenue exit and head north (left if you are coming from the west, right if from the east) and go 3.6 miles to where Lake Avenue meets Loma Alta Drive.  Park on the corner.
  • Agency: Angeles National Forest, Los Angeles River District
  • Distance: 11.4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 2,800 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Elevation gain, distance)
  • Suggested time: 6 hours
  • Best season: October – May
  • USGS topo maps: Mt. Wilson, Pasadena
  • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sun hat
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot & Afield Los Angeles County
  • More information: Trip descriptions here and here; Yelp page here; Meetup description here; Wikipedia article about the history of the Mt. Lowe Railway here
  • Rating: 9
Sam Merrill Trail Head, Echo Mountain, Altadena, CA

0:00 – Sam Merrill trail head at the Cobb Estate (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

It might not be well known today, but in its time, the Mt. Lowe Railway was one of Los Angeles’s most popular and impressive tourist attractions. The railway didn’t survive the Great Depression and was quickly forgotten as Disneyland and Universal Studios became more famous, but intrepid hikers can still experience some of the history of it, enjoying the same panoramic views of the passengers.

View from the Sam Merrill Trail near Echo Mountain, Altadena, CA

1:05 – View from near the junction with the Echo Mountain Trail (times are approximate)

There are several ways to visit the sites of the Mt. Lowe Railway. This post describes the most common route: a 2.5 mile climb on the Sam Merrill Trail to Echo Mountain (the Mt. Lowe Railway’s lower terminus and a popular and worthwhile hiking destination in its own right), followed by a loop of about six miles, tracing the route of the railway on the ascent and descending via Castle Canyon – highlighted by the outstanding views at Inspiration Point. The hike is a strenuous workout but navigation and terrain are easy and the mix of history and scenic variety makes it very enjoyable.

Plaque describing the history of the Mt. Lowe Railroad, Echo Mountain Trail, Altadena, CA

1:19 – Interpretive plaque

From Lake Avenue, follow the Sam Merrill Trail to Echo Mountain, steadily climbing a series of tight switchbacks with dramatic views of the L.A. basin especially on clear days. Near the top of the ridge the trail levels out and you reach a junction. If you haven’t already been to Echo Mountain, head straight for a short distance where you can enjoy some great views and see equipment from the railroad. (Echo Mountain was the top end of the Great Incline segment of the train and the start of the Mt. Lowe Railway).

Sentinel Rock, Echo Mountain Trail, Mt. Lowe Railway site, Altadena, CA

1:25 – Sentinel Rock

To follow the railway’s course, take a hard left on the Echo Mountain Trail. It continues uphill at a more moderate grade, heading northwest. Soon you pass the first of several interpretive plaques describing the history of the railroad, including vintage photographs. Continuing past “Sentinel Rock” you soon reach a junction known as the Cape of Good Hope.

Millard Canyon from the Sunset Ridge Fire Road above the Cape of Good Hope, Angeles National Forest, CA

1:30 – View of Millard Canyon from the Sunset Ridge Fire Road above the Cape of Good Hope

Turn right onto the Sunset Ridge Fire Road, which soon provides you with excellent views of Millard Canyon. Continue up the fire road, passing a tight horseshoe curve that the railroad had to negotiate and the site of the circular bridge, one of the technical and visual high-lights of the trip. The trail traverses a pleasant north-facing slope, shaded by pines and black oaks, reaching the site of Ye Alpine Tavern (now the Mt. Lowe Trail Camp.) Though it was hoped that the railway would reach what was then called Oak Mountain – now Mt. Lowe – this was the highest it ever got.

Fall colors on the Echo Mountain Trail, Angeles National Forest, CA

2:30 – Fall colors shortly before the Ye Alpine Tavern site

The trail makes a hairpin right turn and heads south to a four-way junction. Take the middle of the forks (the right fork is the upper end of the Sam Merrill Trail which also leads back to Echo Mountain; the left fork leads to Mt. Lowe). Soon you reach Inspiration Point, where you can enjoy the best view of the trip: the Santa Ana, Santa Monica and Verdugo Mountains, the Palos Verdes Peninsula, downtown L.A., Catalina Island and if visibility is good, Santa Barbara Island. Viewing tubes help you pinpoint certain locations.

View from a saddle between Echo Mountain, Mt. Lowe and Mt. Wilson, Angeles National Forest, CA

2:35 – View from the four way junction at the saddle

From here, take the single-track Castle Canyon Trail downhill. The trail is steep and loose in some places, although not too difficult. You drop into the pleasant shade of the canyon’s upper reaches, cross a seasonal stream and take in a few more views to the southeast before the trail levels out, returning to the ridge of Echo Mountain. Turn right and retrace your steps down the Sam Merrill Trail.

View of the Los Angeles Basin from Inspiration Point, Angeles National Forest

3:00 – Panoramic view from Inspiration Point

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

View from the Castle Canyon Trail, Angeles National Forest, Los Angeles County, CA

4:00 – Looking southeast from the Castle Canyon Trail, shortly before rejoining the Echo Mountain Trail

Ryan Mountain (Joshua Tree National Park)

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View of San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak from Ryan Mountain, Joshua Tree National Park

San Jacinto and San Gorgonio from Ryan Mountain

Boulders on the Ryan Mountain Trail, Joshua Tree National Park

Boulders near the Ryan Mountain trail head

Ryan Mountain  (Joshua Tree National Park)

  • Location: Joshua Tree National Park. From Highway 62, about six miles past the junction with Highway 247 and 26 miles northeast of I-10, take Park Boulevard (signed for the park) south (turn right if you’re coming from the west, left if from the east). Follow the road for a total of 17.6 miles to the signed Ryan Mountain Trail Head on the right side of the road, shortly past the junction with Keys View Road. Admission is $15 per vehicle for a week. Annual Joshua Tree National Park passes are $30. The inter-agency America the Beautiful pass ($80 per year) is also accepted here.
  • Agency: Joshua Tree National Park
  • Distance: 2.8 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,050 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Best season:  October – April (day use only; gate shuts at sunset)
  • USGS topo maps: “Indian Cove”, “Keys View”
  • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sun hat
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Inland Empire
  • More information: Trip descriptions here, here and here; video of the hike here
  • Rating: 9

Excellent views and an easy-to-follow trail make Ryan Mountain (elevation 5,457) one of Joshua Tree National Park’s most popular destinations. The trail is steep but the scenery is beautiful and varied from start to finish. You’re likely to have company on the trail but the hike still manages to feel isolated, thanks to the vastness of the terrain surrounding the mountain.

Ryan Mountain trail head, Joshua Tree National Park

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

From the parking area, follow the trail as it makes its way between some giant boulders. In 0.2 miles, a trail from the sheep pass campground joins up from the left. The trail to Ryan mountain stays straight, climbing steeply up a northwestern facing ridge. As you ascend, your efforts yield great views of San Jacinto and San Gorgonio.

San Jacinto Peak as seen from the Ryan Mountain Trail, Joshua Tree National Park

0:18 – View of San Jacinto Peak (times are approximate)

At about o.8 miles, the trail reaches a saddle dotted with a few pinyon pines. Continue uphill to a bench (1.1 miles) where a lone Joshua tree presides over the steeply dropping eastern slope of the mountain. The grade levels out here and the last 0.3 miles to the summit are the easiest.

On the long, almost flat peak, you enjoy a panoramic view including the giants to the west, the Santa Rosas, the Little San Bernardinos and a nearly aerial view of Wonderland of Rocks, Lost Horse Valley and more. A metal sign identifies the peak by name for photo ops. After enjoying the view descend via the same route.

0:28 - Pinyon pines at the saddle, about 2/3 of the way up

0:28 – Pinyon pines at the saddle, about 2/3 of the way up

In case you were wondering, Ryan Mountain was named after brothers Thomas and Jep Ryan, former owners of the nearby Lost Horse Mine, another one of the park’s popular destinations.

0:40 - Lone Joshua Tree at an overlook near the top

0:40 – Lone Joshua Tree at an overlook near the top

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Panoramic view from Ryan Mountain, Joshua Tree National Park

0:43 – Looking northeast from the summit

Elsmere Canyon

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Waterfall in Elsmere Canyon, Santa Clarita Valley, CA

Waterfall in Elsmere Canyon

Geology in Elsmere Canyon, Santa Clarita Valley, CA

The Towsley geological formation, Elsmere Canyon

Elsmere Canyon

  • Location: Santa Clarita.  From the 14 Freeway, take the Newhall Ave. exit.  If you’re coming from the south, turn right; the north, left, and drive to the end of the street and park in the dirt lot.  (If the lot is full, you may need to use the lower lot, where there is a $5 fee.)
  • Agency: City of Santa Clarita
  • Distance: 2.6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 250 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Best season:  Year round (best after recent rains)
  • USGS topo maps: Oat Mountain, San Fernando
  • More information: here; trip description here; video of the waterfall here; Everytrail report (loop route) here
  • Rating: 7
Elsmere Canyon Open Space, Santa Clarita, CA

0:00 – Elsmere Canyon Open Space trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

The small seasonal waterfall in Elsmere Canyon is a pleasant surprise for hikers who may feel as if they know all of the trails in the Santa Clarita Valley.  Even during the summer months when the waterfall is likely to be dry the enjoyable stroll along the Creek Trail is a good way to beat the heat. Elsmere Canyon is large (over 1,200 acres) and the 6-mile loop around the perimeter of the park is a challenging workout, but power lines and exposure to freeway noise detract from the experience. The short hike to and from the waterfall is the most enjoyable one in the park and one of the best easy hikes in the area.

Creek Trail, Elsmere Canyon Open Space, Santa Clarita, CA

0:06 – Bear left on the Creek Trail (times are approximate)

From the Whitney Canyon Trail Head, which also serves as an entry point to Elsmere Canyon, follow the trail signed for Elsmere Canyon as it heads south along the border of the parking lot, up a ridge and downhill to a junction (0.2 miles.) Bear left on the signed Creek Trail which follows a pleasant course along a seasonal stream, crossing it several times. Soon you’re under the shade of oaks and you’ll also notice the tall rock walls, part of the Towsley Formation, rising high on the west side of the canyon.

Single track trail in Elsmere Canyon Open Space, Santa Clarita, CA

0:27 – Turnoff for the waterfall

At 0.9 miles, you reach a junction with a wide fire road. Bear right, go a short distance and then head left on a single-track trail leading deeper into the woods. You will have to negotiate a few  creek crossings, some of which may be tricky if water levels are high. Adding to the challenge are several fallen trees, the result of the Foothill Fire of 2004 and other blazes. Overall though the navigation and terrain aren’t too difficult and after 0.4 miles, you find yourself at the base of the waterfall.

The lower tier which is about 10 feet can be climbed fairly easily for those with experience, assuming that the water level isn’t high enough to present a hazard. The upper tier is about 20 feet tall and pours down into a shallow pool. Whether you observe the waterfall from the bottom or the middle, it’s an attractive, peaceful spot, only a few miles from civilization but virtually isolated.

Waterfall in Elsmere Canyon Open Space, Santa Clarita, CA

0:45 – Elsmere Canyon waterfall

There are more waterfalls beyond this one that can be reached by climbers who possess the necessary equipment and knowledge, but for hikers who don’t want to risk becoming part of the conversation about what steps managing agencies should take to regulate open spaces, this is the turnaround point. On the way back, if it’s a cool day and you’re looking for a little more of a workout, consider taking the Elsmere Canyon Loop instead of the Creek Trail, adding 0.2 miles and about 200 feet of elevation gain. It lacks the serenity of the Creek Trail but does provide some nice views of the Santa Clarita Valley, including the distant Sierra Pelona range.

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve

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View of San Vicente Reservoir, San Diego, CA from the Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve

San Vicente Reservoir from the Oak Oasis Preserve

Oak trees in the Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakeside, CA

Oak woodland, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve

Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve

      • Location: Lakeside, east of San Diego. From the north end of the freeway portion of Highway 67, take a right on Mapleview, go 0.3 miles and turn left on Ashwood St. Follow Ashwood for a total of 4.3 miles (it becomes Wildcat Canyon Road) and turn left into the signed Oak Oasis County Park lot. The road to the park is narrow so observe the 10 miles per hour speed limit. From Ramona, take San Vicente Road southeast to Barona Road. Turn right and follow Barona Road, which becomes Wildcat Canyon Road, 9 miles to the park. The park will be on the right side of the road.
      • Agency: San Diego County Parks & Recreation
      • Distance: 2.7 miles
      • Elevation gain: 300 feet
      • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
      • Difficulty Rating: PG
      • Best season:  Year round (8am-4:30pm daily)
      • USGS topo map: San Vicente Reservoir
      • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: San Diego County
      • More information: Yelp page here; trip descriptions here and here
      • Rating: 6

Located just beyond the San Diego suburban fringe, Oak Oasis (known too as Oakoasis) County Park is an attractive 230-acre parcel of open space that offers panoramic views of the San Vicente Reservoir and Iron Mountain, plus interesting geology, meadows, glimpses into the history of the land and yes, oaks.

Trail head, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve

0:00 – Trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

The 2003 Cedar Fire was perhaps the most dramatic episode in the area’s history, claiming the old Minshall House. Fortunately the park is showing signs of recovery from the fire. The park is an enjoyable place for simply wandering without a specific route or destination; it’s a stop on the San Diego Trans-County Trail, which comes up from the west and continues east toward El Capitan. There are several possible routes to take and the 2.7-mile loop described here offers a nice sampling of the area’s scenery.

Trail junction, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakeside, CA

0:07 – Junction with the county trail (times are approximate)

From the trail head at the north side of the parking lot, descend past the information board to the trans-country trail. Turn left and follow it through chaparral to a Y-junction. Bear left and follow the trans-country trail as it climbs briefly to a ridge, providing some nice views, before dipping back into the oak-shaded canyon.

Oak woodland, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakeside, CA

0:20 – Rejoining the Oak Oasis Loop

Here, bear left and follow the canyon, staying straight at another turnoff. A plaque describes the unfortunate history of the Minshall House, which once stood at that location. Shortly after the plaque, a spur leads to an overlook between two trees.

You leave the woodland and come back into the open, with the San Vicente Reservoir spread out ahead. Bear right as the country trail heads left and begin a moderate climb, rejoining the trail from below. A short spur leads to another overlook where you get an even better view of the reservoir and Iron Mountain dominating to the north.

Informational plaque, Minshall House site, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakeside, CA

0:23 – Sign at the former Minshall House site

More climbing past some jumbled granite boulders brings you to a small, oak-lined meadow and the half-way point of the loop. The trail then descends into a chaparral-lined canyon, passes through a field and some private houses and re-enters the oak woodland. Bear left at the next junction and make a brief climb to rejoin the trans-country trail, completing the loop. From here, retrace your steps back to the parking lot.

Meadow in the Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakesisde, CA

0:43 – Meadow; half way point

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Oak woodlands, Oak Oasis Open Space Preserve, Lakeside, CA

1:00 – Back into the woodlands

Bouquet Canyon to Sierra Pelona via Pacific Crest Trail

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View from the Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest, CA

Looking north from the Pacific Crest Trail across Bouquet Canyon

Woodlands on the Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest, CA

Woodlands on the Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona

Bouquet Canyon to Sierra Pelona via Pacific Crest Trail

  • Location: Liebre Mountains north of Los Angeles, east of I-5 and west of Highway 14. From the north, take Highway 14 to Avenue N. Turn right and head west for 4.6 miles. Turn left on Godde Hill Road and follow it 3.1 miles to its end at Elizabeth Lake Road. Turn right and go 0.7 miles to Bouquet Canyon Road. Turn left and go 4.3 miles to a dirt turnout on the left side of the road where the Pacific Crest Trail crosses. From the south, take Highway 14 to Sand Canyon Road. Turn left and head northwest for 2 miles to Sierra Highway. Turn right and go 0.4 miles to Vasquez Canyon Road. Turn left and follow Vasquez Canyon 3.6 miles to its ending at Bouquet Canyon Road. Turn right and follow Bouquet Canyon Road for a total of 13.7 miles, past the reservoir and the junction with Spunky Canyon Road, to a dirt turnout on the right side of the road where the Pacific Crest Trail crosses. Though “Trails of the Angeles” indicates that a National Forest Service Adventure Pass is required to park here, there is no notice to that effect at the parking area; recent policy changes that allow free parking at unimproved National Forest areas such as this one would seem to indicate that the pass is not required. However if you want to buy a pass just to be sure, or for use at other trail heads that require it, click here.
  • Agency: Angeles National Forest, Santa Clarita and Mojave Rivers Ranger District
  • Distance: 5.8 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,400 feet
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Difficulty rating: PG-13 (elevation gain, distance)
  • Best season: Year round but hot during the summer and possible snow during the winter; also known for high winds
  • USGS topo map: Sleepy Valley
  • Recommended guidebook: Trails of the Angeles
  • More information: Video about the hike here; Pacific Crest Trail association home page here
  • Rating: 7
Trail head on Bouquet Canyon Road, Angeles National Forest, CA

0:00 – Trail head on Bouquet Canyon Road (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This enjoyable section of the Pacific Crest Trail climbs the south slope of Bouquet Canyon to the long ridge of Sierra Pelona, offering panoramic views along the way. The nearly three mile ascent makes a good workout and can be done in an afternoon, although hikers wanting more of a challenge can either continue along the P.C.T. or follow the Martindale Ridge Fire Road to Mt. McDill.

From the turnout, follow a short spur leading to the Pacific Crest Trail. The P.C.T. ascends steadily for the first 0.9 miles, passing a tall oak and climbing the side of the ridge. There’s not much in the way of shade trees, but if you get off to an early start, the sharply rising ridge will block out most of the sun.

Steep ascent on the Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest, CA

0:25 – Hard left at the intersection (times are approximate)

Just under a mile from the start, you reach a junction. Take a hard left and continue following the Pacific Crest Trail as it makes a short but noticeably steep ascent to a bench. The views include Martindale Canyon and distant Bouquet Reservoir to the west (right) and the Antelope Valley to the east. Far below to the north, the road winds through the canyon.

Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest, CA

0:36 – View on the ridge after the steep climb

Past the bench, the grade continues to be moderate and enjoyable. The trail weaves in and out of several stands of black oaks and through gently sloping meadows. At about 2.5 miles, you pass Bear Spring, a nice place to sit and rest, although it can’t be counted on for water.

Just under three miles from the start, the trail passes by a particularly impressive oak and enters a field where it meets up with the fire road, the turnaround point. Here, you can enjoy a view that on clear days includes peaks on the north slope of the San Gabriels across the Santa Clarita Valley.

Black oaks on the Pacific Crest Trail, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest

1:06 – Black oaks near Bear Spring

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Looking north from the Pacific Crest Trail at the Martindale Ridge Fire Road, Sierra Pelona, Angeles National Forest, CA

1:25 – Looking north from the top of the ridge (turnaround point)