Engelmann Oak Loop (Daley Ranch)

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Live oaks in Daley Ranch on the Bobcat Trail

Live oaks in Daley Ranch on the Bobcat Trail

Engelmann Oak Loop (Daley Ranch)

      • Location: Northwest of Escondido.  From I-15, take the Deer Springs/Mountain Meadow exit.  Head east on Mountain Mountain (turn left if you’re coming from the north, right if from the south).  Go 2.3 miles (Mountain Meadow becomes Hidden Meadow along the way).  Turn right on Meadow Glen Way and go 0.3 miles to Cougar Pass Road.  Turn right and go 0.3 miles.  Turn right again and continue on Cougar Pass Road which is now dirt (but passable by normal passenger vehicles.)  Go 0.5 miles and park in the dirt lot on the right side of the road, opposite the signed trailhead.
      • Agency: Daley Ranch
      • Distance: 4.7 miles
      • Elevation gain: 800 feet
      • Suggested time: 2 hours
      • Difficulty Rating: PG
      • Best season:  October – June
      • USGS topo map: Valley Center
      • Reommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: San Diego County
      • More information: Trip description here; Daley Ranch Yelp page here; Everytrail report here
      • Rating: 7
0:00 - Friendly reminder at the trailhead (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Friendly reminder at the trailhead (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This enjoyable loop explores the lightly visited northern sector of large Daley Ranch on the outskirts of Escondido.  As the trail name might lead you to believe, there are plenty of Engelmann oaks (as well as the more common coastal live oaks) to be seen here – similar to those found at the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve farther north near Murrieta.

0:21 - Stay right at the first junction with the Bobcat Trail (times are approximate)

0:21 – Stay right at the first junction with the Bobcat Trail (times are approximate)

The Engelmann Oak trail only accounts for about a mile of this hike, although hiking the entire trail is one of several possible variations on the route. From the parking area, follow the Cougar Ridge Trail through a meadow, into a wooded canyon with a seasonal stream and up 200 feet to a saddle where it dips to meet a junction with the Engelmann Oak Trail. Stay straight and head into another woodland, passing by a junction with the Bobcat Trail (your return route), 0.9 miles from the start.

0:40 - Vista point at the junction of the Cougar Ridge and Engelmann Oak Trails

0:40 – Vista point at the junction of the Cougar Ridge and Engelmann Oak Trails

Staying on the Cougar Ridge Trail, you begin a steady climb along the south side of Burnt Mountain. Here you get good views south toward the rest of the park. An ascent of about 400 feet brings you to a junction with the other end of the Engelmann Oak Trail, while the Cougar Ridge Trail continues south. A short spur leads to a spot where boulders beneath oaks make a good resting point with panoramic views.

Continuing north along the Engelmann Oak Trail, now on Burnt Mountain’s east side, the trail levels out. At about 2 miles from the start, you reach a junction. Both routes are options as they will soon intersect; if you want to leave the fire road, turn left on the single-track Burnt Mountain Trail, which climbs to a saddle where you get some wide-ranging vistas northwest.

After dropping down to rejoin the Engelmann Oak Trail, head left (west). You head through some pleasant, rolling hills and meadows before reaching a junction with the Bobcat Trail (2.9 miles). Head left on this scenic single-track and descend into a quiet ravine lined with oaks. (If you’re pressed for time, you can continue on the Engelmann trail, which is a slightly shorter return to the Cougar Ridge Trail.)

1:30 - On the Bobcat Trail shortly before it rejoins the Cougar Ridge Trail

1:30 – On the Bobcat Trail shortly before it rejoins the Cougar Ridge Trail

At 3.8 miles from the start, the Bobcat Trail reaches a T-junction. Turn right and go a short distance to rejoin the Cougar Ridge Trail, which you will follow back to the parking area.

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

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Mason Regional Park

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Open space in Mason Regional Park

Open space in Mason Regional Park

Shade trees in Mason Regional Park

Shade trees in Mason Regional Park

Mason Regional Park

  • Location: Irvine.  Free parking is available on the corner of Rosa Drew Drive and Tamarack Way.  From I-405, take the Jeffrey Rd./Unviersity Dr. exit.  Head west (left if you’re coming from the south, right if from the north) and go 0.7 miles to Rosa Drew Drive.  Turn right, go a short distance and park where available.
  • Agency:  Orange County Parks & Recreation
  • Distance: 2.8 miles
  • Elevation gain: Level
  • Difficulty Rating: G
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Best season:  Year round
  • USGS topo map: “Tustin”
  • More information:  Mason Park homepage here; Yelp page here; park descriptions here and here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 2

The eastern part of William Mason Regional Park is known as the “Wilderness Area”, which may be a little generous (the majority of the trails are paved), but it’s still a nice and convenient place to get some fresh air and exercise.  Though some traffic noise can be heard, this section of the park has a pleasantly secluded feel. Dogs are allowed with a 6-foot leash.

0:00 - Beginning of the hike on Rosa Drew Drive (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Beginning of the hike on Rosa Drew Drive (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

From the parking area on the east side of Rosa Drew Drive, cross the street and head south. Cross University, continue south and make a hard right on a paved walkway leading into the park. You cross a seasonal stream and head west on the path. Signed as the Sand Canyon Wash on park maps, this is the main artery through the wilderness area.

0:03 - Turn right into the park (times are approximate)

0:03 – Turn right into the park (times are approximate)

A few benches make for a nice place to sit and there’s a decent amount of shade from the willows. At 0.7 miles you reach a junction. The two paths soon rejoin but the left route, which briefly leaves the pavement, is more pleasant. If you go this way take an almost immediate right and continue walking on the trail before rejoining the paved walkway (0.9 miles.)

0:14 - Bear left onto the dirt trail

0:14 – Bear left onto the dirt trail

Soon after the paths converge, you reach an intersection. You can extend the hike by heading left but for this route, head right, continuing west. Stay straight at another intersection (the right route is a spur to University Drive). You make another stream crossing and travel in and out of shade.

0:21 - Turn right at the junction

0:21 – Turn right at the junction

At 1.3 miles, you reach a final junction, shortly before Culver Drive. Both routes lead a short distance to Culver, a good turnaround point. However, if you want to extend your hike, you can cross Culver Drive and walk through the more developed part of Mason Regional Park; this might be a fun option for families with small kids.

0:32 - Turnaround point (Culver Drive)

0:32 – Turnaround point (Culver Drive)

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve

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Los Penasquitos Creek, below the waterfall

Los Penasquitos Creek, below the waterfall

Looking east from the canyon above the waterfall

Looking east from the canyon above the waterfall

Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve

  • Location: North San Diego.  From Highway 56, take the Black Mountain Road exit and head south for a mile.  Turn right into the Canyonside Community Park, drive past the ballfields, turn right and park.  From I-15, take the Mercy Road exit and head west for 1.4 miles.  Turn right on Black Mountain Road and make a quick left into the park.
  • Agency: Los Pensasquitos Canyon Preserve/County of San Diego
  • Distance: 6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 300 feet
  • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Best season:  All year
  • USGS topo map: “Del Mar”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat
  • More information:  Here; Yelp page here; Everytrail report (slightly different route) here; trail map here
  • Rating: 6

San Diego hikers who assume they have to travel to the eastern part of the county to experience solitude will be pleasantly surprised by Los Penasquitos Canyon.  Although the preserve doesn’t feel as remote as the Palmoar or Laguna Mountains, it is surprisingly quiet, considering how close it is to civilization.  You are likely to have company from fellow hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians and airplanes will buzz overhead, but the park is still a nice, convenient place to get away from it all.

0:00 - Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

0:00 – Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

There are over ten miles of trails crossing the preserve, so it is possible to do several different routes. The 6-mile round trip described here uses the park’s main trail, on the south side of the creek, and visits a small waterfall.  Unfortunately fallen boulders obscure most of the waterfall but it’s still a nice place to sit and relax, and perhaps dip your feet.

0:03 - Footbridge in Los Penasquitos Canyon (times are approximate)

0:03 – Footbridge in Los Penasquitos Canyon (times are approximate)

From the south side of the parking lot, follow the signed trail into the preserve.  You cross a footbridge and reach the main trail, a fire road, at 0.2 miles.  Turn right and head east. For the next nearly 3 miles, you head in and out of groves of oaks and sycamores and also pass through some open fields. Several trails branch off on the right side of the road, looping back to the main trail; you can explore some of these for variety.

0:35 - Grove of sycamores on the Los Penasquitos Trail

0:35 – Grove of sycamores on the Los Penasquitos Trail

You pass a couple of big junctions, one on each side of the trail, after about a mile. Continue heading east, passing a four-way junction (“Carson’s Crossing”) at 2.4 miles.  Shortly after the 3 mile mark, follow a sign for the waterfall.  You head down a steep staircase to the banks of the creek.

0:53 - Sign at "Carson's Crossing" intersection on the way to the waterfall

0:53 – Sign at “Carson’s Crossing” intersection on the way to the waterfall

If you’re feeling adventurous, you can cross the creek and climb down the rocks and sit by the water.  Although the waterfall is hidden behind the boulders, this is a nice place to dip your feet and enjoy the sound of the stream before turning around.  Keep an eye out for crawfish that may be swimming in the pools. You can return via the same route or by the trail on the north side of the creek.

1:10 - Sign for the waterfall

1:10 – Sign for the waterfall

In case you were wondering, Penasquitos means “the little cliffs.” Near the parking lot, you can visit the historic Rancho Penasquitos adobe, dating back to the mid 19th century.

1:15 - Los Penasquitos Stream above the waterfall

1:15 – Los Penasquitos Stream above the waterfall

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Highland Valley Trail

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Through a field on the Highland Valley Trail

Through a field on the Highland Valley Trail

Oaks on the Highland Valley Trail

Oaks on the Highland Valley Trail

Highland Valley Trail

      • Location: 12373 Highland Valley Road, south of Escondido, near Rancho Bernardo.   From I-15, take the W. Bernardo Drive/Pomerado Road exit.  Turn right (regardless of what direction you’re coming from) on Pomerado Road and go about a quarter mile to Highland Valley Road.  Turn left and almost immediately turn right into the parking area.  The trail head is open from 6am-6pm from November to March and 6am-730pm from April to October.
      • Agency: San Dieguito River Park
      • Distance: 4.2 miles
      • Elevation gain: 150 feet
      • Suggested time: 2 hours
      • Difficulty Rating: PG
      • Best season:  Year round
      • USGS topo map: Escondido
      • Recommended gear: sunblock; sun hat
      • Reommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: San Diego County
      • More information: Trip description here; Yelp page here; Everytrail report here
      • Rating: 5
0:00 - Information board by the trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

0:00 – Information board by the trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

The San Dieguito River Park is quietly becoming one of Southern California’s major networks of hiking trails. The goal is to provide a chain of continuous public lands and recreational trails that reaches 55 miles from the Volcan Mountain Preserve near Julian to the coastline at Del Mar. This segment, just south of Escondido, is a pleasant 2-mile walk through some fields and oak woodlands, with nice views of the mountains nearby. It never really escapes the noise of the freeway and busy Highland Valley Road, but it’s still a nice excursion if you’re in the area.

0:07 - Crossing the dirt service road (times are approximate)

0:07 – Crossing the dirt service road (times are approximate)

From the parking lot, the trail begins near the information board, where you can pick up a brochure describing the plant life along the way, including coastal sage, cottonwood and more. At 0.3 miles, you cross a dirt service road and the trail dips into a wooded ravine, crossing a footbridge. Leaving the shade, the trail continues along the side of a hill through terrain that may remind some of the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve in Riverside County. You go in and out of pockets of oak trees, while large granite boulders dot the hillside.

0:08 - Footbridge

0:08 – Footbridge

At 1.2 miles, you cross a paved service road, and soon after, the trail bends to the south, following Sycamore Creek Road. As you head farther from Highland Valley Road, the noise of the traffic dies down.

0:28 - Crossing the paved service road

0:28 – Crossing the paved service road

At 1.9 miles, you cross Sycamore Creek Road and continue south. There are a couple of small but sudden dips in the trail to watch out for as it crosses a few more dirt roads. At 2.1 miles, shortly before the end of Sycamore Creek Road, you reach a picnic area, the end of the trail. Shaded by oaks, this is a nice, quiet place to sit and relax before turning around.

0:43 - Heading down toward Sycamore Creek Road

0:43 – Heading down toward Sycamore Creek Road

Text and photography copyright 2012 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

1:00 - Picnic area (the turnaround point)

1:00 – Picnic area (the turnaround point)

San Onofre Back Country Loop

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Under the trees in the San Onofre back country

Under the trees in the San Onofre back country

Fire road, San Onofre Back Country

Fire road, San Onofre Back Country

San Onofre Back Country Loop

    • Location: San Clemente Dog Park, on the corner of Avenida La Pata and Calle Extremo, San Clemente.  From I-5, take the Avenida Pico exit and head northeast for 1.7 miles.  Turn right on Avenida La Pata and follow it 1.4 miles to its terminus at Calle Extremo, by the entrance to the dog park.
    • Agency: San Onofre State Beach
    • Distance: 4.7 miles
    • Elevation gain: 550 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG
    • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
    • Best season: October – June
    • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock
    • USGS topo map: San Onofre Bluffs
    • More information:  here; Everytrail report here
    • Rating: 4
0:00 - Trail head at the dog park (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

0:00 – Trail head at the dog park (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

Like nearby Crystal Cove State Park, San Onofre State Beach is best known for its coastline and camping, but also features an extensive network of trails in the back country.  The north end of the park lacks the scenic variety of Crystal Cove, but this loop, which starts from the dog park on the edge of San Clemente, offers a moderate workout with free access.  It’s a good route to keep in mind if you feel like you’ve tapped out all of Orange County’s regional trails.

0:02 - Beginning the descent (times are approximate)

0:02 – Beginning the descent (times are approximate)

There are a bunch of trails in the north end of the park, and the navigation can be a little confusing, so keep an eye out for a few key landmarks. For orientation, remember that Camp Pendleton is to the east and Cristianitos Road marks the southern end of the area.

0:21 - Footbridges

0:21 – Footbridges

From the dog park, head east, crossing the San Diego County line. After passing an information board–displaying an impressive photo of a mountain lion–you reach a fire road (your return route.) Stay straight and begin descending on a single-track trail that zig-zags its way down into the canyon. At about 0.8 miles you cross a pair of footbridges, and come a junction. Stay right and continue your descent.  Just after passing a sign post marked #7, you cross another footbridge. At sign post 8, turn right, continue following the canyon, crossing under a fallen willow and passing by a giant sycamore tree.

0:28 - Crossing the footbridge past Sign Post 7

0:28 – The footbridge past Sign Post 7

Heading south now, you climb up and down a small hill and then come to another footbridge – this one in disrepair, so you’ll have to jump over it or carefully step down into the ditch. You follow a barbed wire fence for a little ways, passing through a field where several false trails branch off (though the main route remains obvious.)

0:30 - Sign post 8

0:30 – Sign post 8

At 2.6 miles, just before you reach Cristianitos Road, turn right and head uphill. You climb a ridge, with nice views down into a canyon on the left. After crossing under some tall power lines, you enter a pleasantly quiet area, where you will join up with a fire road coming up from the south (3.6 miles). Bear right and continue making your way north, getting some nice views of the southern end of the Santa Ana Mountains.

0:33 - Low bridge!

0:33 – Low bridge!

The trail makes one last ascent, following a ridge before dropping back down toward the dog park, completing the loop.  If you have time, you can continue north along the fire road, which meets up with the city of San Clemente’s Prima Deshecha Trail.

1:15 - Turn right and begin heading uphill, just before Cristianitos Road

1:15 – Turn right and begin heading uphill, just before Cristianitos Road

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

2:15 - Heading back toward the park on the fire road, near the end of the loop

2:15 – Heading back toward the park on the fire road, near the end of the loop

Crescent Bay, Shaw’s Cove & Sea Cave (Laguna Beach)

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Tidepools, Crescent Bay, Laguna Beach

Tidepools, Crescent Bay, Laguna Beach

Inside Shaws Cove Sea Cave

Inside Shaws Cove Sea Cave

Crescent Bay, Shaw’s Cove & Sea Cave (Laguna Beach)

    • Location: Laguna Beach, on the corner of Cliff Drive and Circle Way.  From Newport Beach, take Pacific Coast Highway south (9.5 miles from Highway 55)  and turn right on Cliff Drive.  From downtown Laguna Beach, head north on P.C.H. and turn left on Cliff Drive (one mile from Highway 133).  Park on the corner, near the signed entrance to the reserve.
    • Agency: Orange County Parks & Recreation
    • Distance: 1 mile
    • Elevation gain: 100 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG
    • Suggested time: 1 hour
    • Best season: All year during low tide (see here for more info)
    • USGS topo map: Laguna Beach
    • More information:  here; Everytrail report here
    • Rating: 5
Beginning of the hike from Cliff Drive (click pictures to see the full sized version)

Beginning of the hike from Cliff Drive (click pictures to see the full sized version)

If you like tidepools and caves, don’t miss this enjoyable rock-hop along the coastline between Laguna Beach and Newport Beach. While the sea cave isn’t quite as big as the one at nearby Corona Del Mar, it’s well worth a visit. Make sure you go during low tide, and even then, be prepared to do some scrambling and don’t be afraid to get wet.

0:02 Crescent Bay (times are approximate)

0:02 Crescent Bay (times are approximate)

From the corner of Cliff Drive and Circle Way, follow the steep walkway down to the beach. You’ll head left (south), walking along scenic Crescent Bay. At the end of the beach, you’ll climb up on the rocks at the bottom of the bluffs, carefully making your way through some tidepools. This brings you to a tiny, quiet cove, in between the rocky promontory you just negotiated, and the one you are about to climb.

0:04 - Climbing the rocks on the eastern edge of Crescent Bay

0:04 – Climbing the rocks on the eastern edge of Crescent Bay

This second climb is also tricky, and the descent is perhaps the most difficult part of the route. As you climb onto a flat area of the rock, next to a fence, look for a crevice to your right that appears to drop straight down to the ocean. In fact, there are a few handholds you can use to lower yourself down, although caution is required. If the tide is high, forget it; even if it’s low, expect to get wet on the descent.

0:13 - Between Crescent Bay and Shaws Cove

0:13 – Between Crescent Bay and Shaws Cove

Once you’re on the rocks at the bottom, continue making your way along the coastline. You arrive at Shaw’s Cove, another beach, and make your way over yet another jumble of rocks (easier than the previous two). You cross another beach, where the walls of rock take on a yellow-orange hue.

0:14 - "She sells sea shells by the sea shore."

0:14 – “She sells sea shells by the sea shore.”

On the opposite side of a beach, beneath a big white building, look for the entrance to a small sea cave. The cave is decent sized; easily big enough to stand up inside.

0:18 - Descending to the ocean before Shaws Cove - be careful!

0:18 – Descending to the ocean before Shaws Cove – be careful!

After exploring the cave, you can return either by the same route, or if you’ve had your fill of tidepools, look for a staircase ascending from Shaw’s Cove. It will take you back to Cliff Drive, where you turn left and walk 0.2 miles back to the starting point.

0:25 - Beach at Shaw's Cove

0:25 – Beach at Shaw’s Cove

Text and photography copyright 2012 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of

0:27 - Moss on the rocks, Shaws Cove

0:27 – Moss on the rocks, Shaws Cove

hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result

0:30 - Inside the sea cave

0:30 – Inside the sea cave

from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Blufftop Trail: Palos Verdes Drive West to Paseo del Mar

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Looking north on the Blufftop Trail

Ocean view from the Blufftop Trail

Blufftop Trail: Palos Verdes Drive West to Paseo del Mar 

  • Location:  Palos Verdes Estates, on the corner of Paseo del Mar and Palos Verdes Drive West.  From I-110, take the Pacific Coast Highway exit and head north/west for 5.6 miles.  Turn left onto Calle Mayor, go 1.3 miles and turn right on Palos Verdes Blvd.  Go 0.5 miles and turn right on Palos Verdes Drive West and go 1.8 miles to the intersection with Paseo del Mar.  Park either on Paseo del Mar or in the small lot on the corner.   From the LAX area, follow Pacific Coast Highway/Sepulveda Blvd. south from I-105 for 8 miles, and turn right on Palos Verdes Blvd.  G0 1.4 miles and turn right on Palos Verdes Drive West and go 1.8 miles to the intersection with Paseo del Mar.
  • Agency: City of Palos Verdes Estates
  • Distance: 1.4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 150 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: G
  • Suggested time: 45 minutes
  • Best season: Year-round
  • USGS topo map:  Redondo Beach
  • More information: video of the trail here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 4

The Blufftop Trail is a non-contiguous path that circles the western and southern edges of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, providing great coastal views. The short section described here is similar to the trails at nearby Point Vicente, although it’s dirt, not paved. On clear days, you can see the Santa Monica Mountains in the distance. This part of the trail makes for a nice little excursion, and you can easily extend your trip on the nearby streets or other segments of the trail. The luxury homes that overlook the trail make it hard to forget about all the nearby development, but it’s far enough off the main road so that peace and quiet can be expected.

From the corner of Palos Verdes Drive West and Paseo del Mar, look for a trail heading toward the ocean, dipping down below the road. It follows Paseo Del Mar, briefly rejoining it, and then splitting off again. You walk along the top of the cliffs (there’s no railing, so be careful), taking in some nice views of Bluff Cove and the western peninsula coastline.

At 0.7 miles, shortly before the trail once again joins Paseo del Mar, you come to a small clearing where a tree–its roots exposed by soil erosion–provides some shade while enjoying the panoramic perspective in both directions. This makes a good turnaround point, although you can continue farther south on Paseo del Mar and visit the southern segments of the trail.

Text and photography copyright 2012 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.