Big Laguna Trail

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View of the Anza-Borrego Desert from the Pacific Crest Trail, eastern San Diego County

View of the Anza-Borrego Desert from the Pacific Crest Trail

Panoramic view of Big Laguna Meadow, Cleveland National Forest, eastern San Diego County

Big Laguna Meadow

Big Laguna Trail

  • Location: Eastern San Diego County in the Cleveland National Forest, near the town of Mt. Laguna.  From San Diego, take I-8 to exit 47 (Sunrise Highway or County Road S1).  Head north (left) for 14.6 miles and park at the Penny Pines Trailhead on the right side of the road.  From Julian and points north take highway 79 to Sunrise Highway/S1 and head southeast (left) for 9.2 miles.  The Penny Pines Trailhead will be on the left.  A National Forest Service Adventure Pass ($5 for a day or $30 for the year) is required for parking. Click here to purchase.
  • Agency: Cleveland National Forest/Descanso District
  • Distance: 10 miles
  • Elevation gain: 900 feet
  • Suggested time: 5 hours
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (distance)
  • Best season:  All year
  • USGS topo maps:  Monument Peak
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield San Diego County
  • More information: Trip descriptions here and here
  • Rating: 8
Start of the Noble Canyon Trail in the Laguna Mountains, San Diego County

0:00 – Start of the hike at the Penny Pines Trail Head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This long but moderately graded loop showcases the scenic variety of the Laguna Mountains, including meadows, pine woodlands and dramatic views of the Anza-Borrego Desert to the east. There are several possible starting points, but this post assumes you will hike from the Penny Pines trail head near mile marker 27.5 on the Sunrise Scenic Highway and go clockwise. This saves the best views for last and allows you to warm up with four virtually flat miles; advantageous for hikers sensitive to altitude (the trail head is a mile above sea level.) The Big Laguna Trail is actually a network of trails and the route described here (6 miles on the Big Laguna and 4 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail) doesn’t have to be followed exactly for an enjoyable experience; do as much or as little as your time and energy allow.

Junction on the Big Laguna Trail, San Diego County

0:24 – Junction at the top of Big Laguna Meadow (times are approximate)

From the Penny Pines trail head, pick up the Noble Canyon Trail on the west side of the highway. Go through a gate and pass by an information board and soon reach a junction where you’ll turn left on the Big Laguna Trail and follow it through a pleasant woodland of Jeffrey pines and black oaks.

Black oaks and pines on the Big Laguna Trail, Laguna Mountains, San Diego County

0:50 – Black oaks and pines, Big Laguna Trail (stay straight at the junction)

Just under a mile from the start, you enter the upper end of Big Laguna Meadow and reach a junction.  Both trails are part of the Big Laguna system but the quickest route is to stay straight, following the eastern side of the meadow (it will be on your right).

Little Laguna Meadow, Cleveland National Forest, eastern San Diego County

1:03 – Bear left at the junction in Little Laguna Meadow

After entering the woods again, stay right at the next junction, a spur leading to a campground. At about 2.5 miles, you reach a T-junction where you’ll head left and walk through a smaller meadow. If there have been recent rains, Little Laguna Lake will come to life. The trail splits but both forks soon reconnect. At 2.8 miles, you reach a fence where you will turn right and cross over a boardwalk (on the opposite side of the fence, the trail continues toward the Laguna Campground.)

Boardwalk on the Big Laguna Trail leading through a meadow, Cleveland Natinonal Forest

1:10 – Take a walk on the boardwalk

Follow the trail with the fence on the left to a service road under a telephone line. Bear left, go a short distance and make a hard left on the Big Laguna Trail which now travels through an attractive grove of tall pines. At about 4 miles from the start, you make another hard left and begin the first significant climbing of the entire route, crossing dirt Los Huecos Road in half a mile. Beyond, the trail passes a primitive campsite and follows a road bed through pines and oaks; when the trail bends north you may get a glimpse of the Cuyamaca Mountains to the west. After a little while the trail splits off to the left and descends toward the Sunrise Scenic Highway.

Service road, Cleveland National Forest, eastern San Diego County

1:27 – Bear left at the junction with the service road

At 5.5 miles you cross the road and ascend for another half mile to meet the Pacific Crest Trail. This is an alternative starting point. Turn left and follow the P.C.T. out of the woods and up to a ridge, where you will get good views of the Cuyamaca Mountains. If visibility is good you may even get a glimpse of the ocean. The rocky outline of Garnet Peak dominates to the north.

Big Laguna Trail heads through pines, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County

1:41 – Up hill through the pines

Soon you reach a saddle where you get some excellent views of Storm Canyon and the desert below. The P.C.T. meanders through the meadow, dropping into a ravine and climbing to a spot where you can observe the view either from a bench or a wooden deck (8.8 miles from the start). This is also an optional trail head.

Pines on the Big Laguna Trail, Cleveland National Forest

2:02 – Leave Los Huercos Road and follow the Big Laguna Trail to the highway

Past the bench, the P.C.T. continues, switch backing once again down into a canyon and continuing north before finally reaching a spur that leads back to the Penny Pines trail head.

View of the Cuyamaca Mountains from the Pacific Crest Trail

2:45 – View of the Cuyamaca Mountains from the Pacific Crest Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

View of the Anza-Borrego Desert from the Pacific Crest Trail, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County

3:50 – View from the bench, just over a mile from the end

 

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Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir

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View of Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir, Hollywood Hills

Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir

Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir

  • Location: Hollywood Hills.  From the San Fernando Valley, take the 101 freeway to Coldwater Canyon.  Head south on Coldwater for 2.5 miles and take a hard right on Franklin Canyon Drive.  Drive 0.7 miles into the park and take a left into the parking lot for the William O. Douglas Outdoor Classroom. Note that there is a camera-enforced stop sign at the intersection.  From Sunset Blvd., head north on Beverly Drive for 0.4 miles.  Take a left to stay on Beverly, and then another left 0.2 miles later.  In 0.9 miles, take a right on Franklin Canyon Drive.  Follow Franklin Canyon Drive for 1.8 miles, around the reservoir, to a T-junction. Turn right and pull into the parking lot.
  • Agency: Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
  • Distance: 0.8 miles
  • Elevation gain: Level
  • Difficulty Rating: G
  • Suggested time: 30 minutes
  • Best season: Year round
  • USGS topo map: Beverly Hills
  • Recommended guidebook: Day Hikes In the Santa Monica Mountains
  • Recommended gear: insect repellent
  • More information: here; trip descriptions (slightly different route) here and here; Franklin Canyon Park Yelp page here
  • Rating: 4
Start of the Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir hike

0:00 – Start of the hike at the Douglas Outdoor Classroom (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Franklin Canyon Park feels a little more like wilderness than most of the other parks in the Hollywood Hills. You’ll still see power lines overhead and hear traffic nearby but if you don’t have time to make it to Malibu Creek or the Angeles National Forest, the park is a nice little spot for an escape into nature. The short but enjoyable walk around the upper reservoir, the smaller of the two in the park, is well worth a visit if you live or work in the area, or perhaps have friends visiting from out of town who want more out of the Hollywood experience than spotting celebrities.

Trail leading toward Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir

0:06 – Leaving the main road toward the lake (times are approximate)

Several trails branch away from the lake, making it easy to extend your hike should you want to; you can also visit the Hastain Trail at the southern end of the park. This post, however, will focus on the short loop around the lake, which can be done with a combination of single-track trails and paved roads. It can be done in either direction, but since the paved road is one-way counter clockwise to traffic, try hiking clockwise so you can always see oncoming cars.

Upper Franklin Canyon Reservoir as seen from the picnic area

0:10 – View of the lake from the picnic area

Leave the parking lot and turn left, immediately arriving at a junction. Turn left again and follow the paved road through a pleasant woodland of pines, sycamores and oaks. At 0.2 miles, cross over the concrete barrier on a wooden staircase and descend toward the lake. Make a hard left and follow the trail (listed as the Chernoff Trail on some maps) to a picnic area where you get a nice view of the reservoir from a bench.

Oak tree on the Wodoc Nature Trail, Franklin Canyon Park

0:20 – Oak on the Wodoc Nature Trail

Continuing through the woods, you reach a staircase leading to a dam at the reservoir’s southern end. Cross it, passing by a private residence and arriving at the Wodoc Nature Trail. This short paved path circles a small pool known as Heavenly Pond, popular with ducks (although feeding is not allowed).

When the nature trail rejoins the road, continue north toward the start of the hike and into a dirt parking lot. You can close the loop out on the paved road but to make it more interesting, take either of the two dirt paths leading out of the lot, both of which rejoin at another picnic area. Follow the trail past the picnic tables, under a large oak and back up to the road where you retrace your steps to the parking lot.

Picnic table, Franklin Canyon Park

0:24 – Picnic area

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Michael Antonovich Regional Park at Joughin Ranch

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View of the Santa Susana Mountains from Michael Antonovich Regional Park, San Fernando Valley, CA

Looking west from the fire road, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Oak woodlands, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Oaks in a tributary of Brown’s Canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

Michael Antonovich Regional Park at Joughin Ranch

  • Location: Santa Susana Mountains north of Chatsworth.  From the 118 Freeway, take the DeSoto Ave. exit.  Head north (turn left if you’re coming from the west, right if from the east) a short distance to the end of DeSoto and turn right on Browns Canyon Road, following the signs for Michael Antonovich Regional Park (not to be confused with nearby Michael Antonovich Open Space or the Michael Antonovich Recreational Trail in San Dimas.)  Follow Browns Canyon Road for 1.2 miles to a small turnout on the left side of the road, marked with a green Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy sign.
  • Agency: Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy/Michael Antonovich Regional Park
  • Distance: 3.3 miles
  • Elevation gain: 500 feet
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Difficulty rating: PG
  • Best season:  September – May
  • USGS topo map: “Oat Mountain”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock
  • More information: Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 5
Michael Antonovich Regional Park trail head

0:00 – Trail head on Brown’s Canyon Road (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This park’s name may be a mouthful, but it helps distinguish it from the nearby Michael Antonovich Open Space and the Michael Antonovich Trail of San Dimas. This loop explores the lower area of the regional park, which is also home to Oat Mountain.

Trail junction, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:10 – Hard left at the four-way junction (times are approximate)

From the parking area, follow the paved road uphill for about 0.4 miles to a four-way junction. This is the start of the loop, which can be hiked in either direction. Hiking it clockwise, as described below, allows you to visit the most scenic part last. The trail on your right leads to a dead end; the vague looking path straight ahead is your return route. Take a hard left and continue climbing uphill. The trail soon becomes a single-track and arrives at a flat.

Single track trail leading into a canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:16 – Follow the single track at the junction

Look for a narrow path heading straight ahead into the canyon. You climb for about 0.3 miles more up the steep and sometimes claustrophobic trail, finally reaching a fire road, listed on some maps as the Curacao Trail, about a mile from the start.

View from the hills above Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:25 – View from the fire road at the top of the ascent (head right)

Turn right and follow the trail along a ridge. The landscape is dominated by Rocky Peak to the west and Oat Mountain to the north; on the way you get aerial views of Browns Canyon and Ybarra Canyon.

After an undulating mile along the ridge, look for a narrow single-track on the right, heading back into the canyon. (Shortly beyond this point, the fire road is blocked by private property). The trail drops, steeply at first, into the tributary of Brown’s Canyon, leveling out at the bottom, making its way in and out of pockets of oaks. At about 2.6 miles, note the curious presence of a solitary pine tree.

Descending into the canyon, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

0:50 – Right turn to descend into the canyon

Shortly beyond the pine, the trail widens into a semblance of a fire road before returning to the intersection, completing the loop. Retrace your steps down the hill back to the parking area on Browns Canyon Road.

Pine tree, Michael Antonovich Regional Park

1:05 – Lone pine in the canyon

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Warner Springs to Eagle Rock via Pacific Crest Trail

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Eagle Rock, northeast San Diego County

Appropriately named Eagle Rock

Panorama from the Pacific Crest Trail, northeast San Diego County

Lone tree on the Pacific Crest Trail on the way back from Eagle Rock

Warner Springs to Eagle Rock via Pacific Crest Trail

  • Location: Across from Cal Fire Station 52, 31049 Highway 79, Warner Springs. The location is 38.7 miles east of Interstate 15, 6.8 miles north of Highway 76 and 13.8 miles north of Highway 78. Park in the narrow dirt turnout across from the fire station by the Pacific Crest Trail decal.
  • Agency: Cleveland National Forest/Palomar Ranger District
  • Distance: 6.6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 700 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Best season: October – June
  • USGS topo map: Warner Springs
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; insect repellent
  • More information: Trip descriptions here and here
  • Rating: 8
Pacific Crest Trail head on highway 79, San Diego County

0:00 – Trail head on Highway 79 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Everything enjoyable about inland San Diego County hiking can be found on this stretch of the Pacific Crest Trail. The destination is Eagle Rock, 3.3 miles from Warner Springs, but even just a short stroll is worthwhile. Scenic highlights include geology, open fields, shaded canyons and a who’s who of San Diego mountains.

Fence on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:10 – Gate before the junction with the CR&H Trail (Times are approximate)

From the turnout across from the fire station, carefully cross Highway 79 and enter the metal gate, signed as a Pacific Crest Trail access point. It drops down to a stream bed and heads east, passing the fire station and school before reaching another gate and a junction with the California Riding & Hiking Trail. The CR&H Trail heads left; the P.C.T. heads straight, entering an attractive canyon filled with oaks, sycamores and willows.

Oak woodlands, Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:27 – Woodlands on the Pacific Crest Trail

You follow the P.C.T. generally east for a very pleasant mile plus, weaving in and out of woodlands, before emerging at a meadow. Here, you can see Hot Springs Mountain, the tallest point in San Diego County, dominating the landscape to the north. You begin climbing, reaching the top of a ridge at about 2 miles from the start. On the way up, keep an eye out for the Palomar Mountain Observatory perched high on the hills to the west, resembling a golf ball.

Meadow and mountains on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County, CA

0:37 – Meadow with distant mountains

On the opposite side of the ridge, the landscape becomes more desert-like, with manzanita trees and even a few cholla and prickly pear cacti. You gradually descend into a valley, taking in views of the Vulcan Mountains on the way and then make another climb to a saddle, where you can see Eagle Rock in the distance. The P.C.T. makes another descent before climbing gradually to a spur leading to the giant granite formation.

View from the top of a ridge on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County

0:47- View from the top of the ridge

From the back side, Eagle Rock’s resemblance to its namesake is quite striking. In addition, the views in all directions are outstanding, making this a perfect spot to sit and enjoy some solitude before heading back.

Manzanita on the Pacific Crest Trail, San Diego County, CA

0:51 – Manzanita on the Pacific Crest Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

View from Eagle Rock, San Diego County, CA

1:20 – View from Eagle Rock

Knapp’s Castle

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View from Knapp's Castle, Santa Barbara, Los Padres National Forest

Looking northwest from Knapp’s Castle

View of the Los Padres National Forest, Santa Barbara, CA from Knapp's Castle

Looking northeast from Knapp’s Castle

Knapp’s Castle

    • Location: Los Padres National Forest north of Santa Barbara. From Highway 101, head north on Highway 154 for 7.8 miles.  Make a hard right on East Camino Cielo and follow it 3 miles (0.9 miles past Painted Cave Road). Park in dirt turnouts on either side of the road.
    • Agency: Los Padres National Forest/Santa Barbara Ranger District
    • Distance: 0.8 mile
    • Elevation gain: 100 feet
    • Suggested time: 30 minutes
    • Difficulty rating: G
    • Best season: Year round
    • USGS topo map: San Marcos Pass
    • Recommended guidebook: Day Hikes Around Santa Barbara
    • More information: Trip descriptions here, here and here; Yelp page here
    • Rating: 7
View of the Santa Ynez Valley, Los Padres National Forest, Knapp's Castle trail head

0:00 – View from the trail head on East Camino Cielo (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Excellent views and historic ruins for very little effort (unless you use the more challenging Snyder Trail) make this understandably one of the most popular hikes in the Santa Barbara area. The hike is on private land but as of this writing, the public is allowed access by the grace of the owners.

The original owner was George Knapp, who completed his mansion in 1920. Unfortunately, like its counterpart in the Santa Monica Mountains the Tropical Terrace, the mansion fell victim to fire; the Paradise Canyon Fire of 1940 to be precise.

On the trail to Knapp's Castle, Los Padres National Forest

0:08 – Junction with the Snyder Trail; stay right (times are approximate)

The hike to reach the mansion could hardly be simpler. From East Camino Cielo, follow the dirt road downhill, taking in outstanding views of the Santa Ynez Valley the entire way. At about 0.3 miles, stay right as the Snyder Trail heads left and downhill toward Paradise Road, almost 2,000 feet below. Pass a fence and follow the trail to the ruins of the house.

Here you can enjoy a 270-degree panorama. Stone arches that were once windows frame the landscape; the old chimney still stands in the midst of a small oak grove. After taking it all in, retrace your steps or, if you’ve left a car a the bottom of the Snyder Trail, you can continue downhill for a point-to-point hike.

Ruins of Knapp's Castle, Los Padres National Forest, Santa Barbara

0:11 – Chimney among the ruins of Knapp’s Castle

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.


Stonewall Creek/Soapstone Grade Loop (Cuyamaca Rancho State Park)

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Panoramic view of fields, mountains and sky, Soapstone Grade Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

Panorama from the Soapstone Grade Fire Road

Upper Green Valley Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

Upper Green Valley Fire Road

Stonewall Creek/Soapstone Grade Loop (Cuyamaca Rancho State Park)

  • Location: Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, inland San Diego County.  From San Diego, take I-8 east to Highway 79.  Head north for 2.7 miles, turn left and continue another 7.3 miles on Highway 79 to the West Mesa Parking Area, on the right side of the road.  From Julian, head south on Highway 79 for 13 miles.  The parking area will be on the left side of the road.
  • Agency: Cuyamaca Rancho State Park
  • Distance: 8.3 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,050 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Distance, elevation gain)
  • Suggested time: 4 hours
  • Best season: September – June
  • USGS topo maps: Cuyamaca Peak
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; insect repellent
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield San Diego County
  • More information: Trip description here; description from a mountain biking website here; Cuyamaca Rancho State Park Yelp page here
  • Rating: 7
Trail head, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

0:00 – Trail head, West Mesa Parking Area (click thumbnails to see the full sized version)

This loop explores several mesa, valleys and canyons east of Stonewall Peak, whose distinctive shape can be seen for much of the hike. The views aren’t as varied or as panoramic as from the summits, but it’s still an enjoyable hike that explores some of the park’s remote terrain. Most of the ascent happens on west-facing slopes, so on warm days, if you get an early start, you can climb in the shade (assuming you hike clockwise, as described here).

Crossing the bed of Stonewall Creek

0:35 – Crossing the bed of Stonewall Creek (times are approximate)

Begin by following the trail signed for the Cold Stream Trail. After crossing the creek bed, turn left on the Cold Stream Trail and follow it a short distance to the Cold Spring Trail.  Bear right and follow it for a pleasant, if not particularly memorable, 1.2 miles. After reaching a ridge, it drops down to cross the Stonewall Creek bed, which is usually dry. This brings you to the Stonewall Creek Fire Road.

Panoramic view from the Soapstone Grade Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

1:10 – Looking north at the junction with the Soapstone Grade Fire Road

Bear left and start climbing gradually, soon reaching a meadow, across which Stonewall Peak stands impressively. You enter a pleasant grove of oaks and after passing the turnoff for the Whitaker Trail, you reach the Soapstone Grade Fire Road (2.8 miles from the start).

Descending the Soapstone Grade Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

1:35 – Starting the descent toward the Upper Green Valley Fire Road

Now, with most of your climbing done, you can enjoy a great view of the valley to the north; on clear days you can see up to the Palomars and perhaps even the Santa Rosa Mountains. Turn right and follow the road as it contours along the south edge of the valley. Adding to the appeal of this stretch is the likelihood of a cool breeze along the ridge. After about a mile, the California Riding & Hiking Trail splits off and you begin a steep descent, reaching the Upper Green Valley Fire Road (4.5 miles from the start.)

Descending the Upper Green Valley Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

1:50 – Upper Green Valley Fire Road

Turn right and begin a more gradual descent along the Sweetwater River. Most of the oaks and pines are still recovering from the fires of 2003 and 2007, but a few still provide some shade. After about two miles, a particularly tall oak with a few flat granite boulders beneath it makes for a perfect picnic spot.

Large oak on the Upper Green Valley Fire Road, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

2:40 – Large oak on the Upper Green Valley Fire Road

Continuing along, you’ll bear right at the next intersection and follow the Upper Green Valley Fire Road to its junction with the lower end of the Stonewall Creek Fire Road. Continue south, passing a short spur leading to a view point beneath a pine where an interpretive plaque describes some of the park’s avian wildlife.

Hill Trail, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

2:58 – Start of the Hill Trail

At 7.3 miles from the start, turn right on the Hill Trail, a single-track which climbs to a ridge and then drops back down to the Cold Stream drainage. Turn right on the Cold Stream Trail and follow it for a pleasant 0.7 miles back to your starting point.

View of Stonewall Peak from the junction of the Hill Trail and Cold Stream Trails, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

3:10 – Stonewall Peak as seen from the bottom of the Hill Trail

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Olinda Oil Museum Trail

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Olinda Oil Museum Trail, Brea, CA

In the canyon on the Olinda Oil Museum Trail

Historic oil well, Olinda Oil Museum

Historic oil well and museum field house

Olinda Oil Museum Trail

    • Location: Olinda Oil Museum, 4025 Santa Fe Rd, Brea. From the 57 Freeway, take the Lambert Road exit and head east for a total of 2.4 miles (Lambert becomes Carbon Canyon/Highway 142). Turn left on Santa Fe and go 0.3 miles to the park entrance, which is on the right. Parking is free but museum donations are encouraged.
    • Agency: City of Brea/California State Parks
    • Distance: 1.9 miles
    • Elevation gain: 350 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG
    • Suggested time: 1 hour for hike; 30 minutes for museum
    • Best season: All year (Trail is open daily 9am-4pm; museum is open from 10am-2pm Wednesday and noon to 4pm Sunday)
    • USGS topo map: Yorba Linda
    • More information: Trip description here; Yelp page here
    • Rating: 4
Olinda Oil Museum Trail beginning

0:00 – Sign by the trail head (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Long before Disneyland or reality television made Orange County famous, oil was discovered. The Olinda Oil Museum pays homage to the history of oil in north Orange County, featuring vintage equipment, historical photographs and a short hiking trail that climbs into the hills above. The 12-acre parcel was deeded to the city in 2003 by real estate developers as part of a deal that allowed them to build new housing tracts in the area.

Service road on the Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:07 – Crossing the second service road; note the trail marker on the right (times are approximate)

The houses and the noise from traffic on nearby Carbon Canyon Road prevent this from being much of a wilderness experience, but the trail still offers a convenient workout with some nice views of north O.C. The historical interest adds appeal. In some ways, this could be considered Orange County’s answer to Griffith Park’s Travel Town, although it would be more accurately called Oil Town.

Interpretive plaque on the Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:12 – Plaque describing the geology of the area

From the parking area, follow the trail which soon changes from concrete to dirt and makes its way up the hillside, crossing two service roads. The numbered trail markers don’t have any interpretive significance; they are simply there to clearly sign the route. You pass by a few active oil drills and interpretive plaques as you switchback up the hill.

View from the top of the Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:15 – View from the top of the trail

At about half a mile–and almost 300 feet of elevation gain – you reach the top of the trail, marked by a lone willow tree. Here you can get a panoramic 180-degree view of the Santa Ana Mountains and Chino Hills to the east and south, and of Orange County’s suburban sprawl to the left. The trail then descends, dropping into a shallow canyon before emerging at a fire road, a mile from the start.

Descending into the canyon, Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:18 – Descending into the canyon

Follow the fire road downhill to another paved service road, which leads out of the canyon, through a grove of eucalyptus trees. The trail emerges at Santa Fe Road, where you turn right and follow it back uphill toward the museum, completing the loop.

Fire road, Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:30 – Joining the fire road, about a mile from the start

If you visit on a Wednesday or Sunday, make sure you allow enough time to visit the museum, the main building of which is a field house from 1912. Other attractions include vintage oil pumps and gears, steam engines, drills, gears, tools and a working klaxon horn which museum volunteers will enthusiastically demonstrate.  (It’s loud.)

Paved road leading out of the canyon on the Olinda Oil Museum Trail

0:36 – Paved road leading out of the canyon

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.