Tag Archives: Verdugo Mountains

Skyline Mountain Way/Brand Motorway Loop (Verdugo Mountains)


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San Gabriels from the Verdugo Fire Road

San Gabriels from the Verdugo Fire Road

Los Angeles skyline from the Brand Motorway

Los Angeles skyline from the Brand Motorway

Skyline Mountain Way/Brand Motorway Loop (Verdugo Mountains)

    • Location: Intersectionof Via Montana and Camino de Villas, Burbank.  From L.A. take I-5 to the Olive Avenue exit.  Turn left on First St. and then right on Olive, and drive a total of 1.5 miles.  (Olive becomes Country Club Drive).  Turn right on Via Montana, go 0.2 miles and park where available on the street.  (Check the signs for parking restrictions).  From the north, take I-5 to Verdugo Avenue.  Turn left on Front St., cross under the freeway and merge onto Verdugo Avenue.  Go 0.4 miles to Glenoaks, turn left and go 0.2 miles to Olive.  Turn right and drive 1.1 miles to the intersection with Via Montana, turn right and go 0.2 miles to the intersection with Camino De Villas.
    • Agency:  City of Glendale Parks & Recreation
    • Distance: 8.4 miles
    • Elevation gain: 2,000 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Elevation gain,  distance, trail condition)
    • Suggested time: 4 hours
    • Best season:  November – April
    • USGS topo maps: “Burbank”
    • Recommended gear: sun block; sun hat; hiking poles; long sleeved shirts and pants
    • More information: Verdugo Mountains Yelp page here; description of the Skyline Mountain Way portion of the hike here; Verdugo Mountains Summit Post page here; Everytrail report here
    • Rating: 7
0:00 - Start of the hike; cross over to the Skyline Mountain Way (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Start of the hike; cross over to Skyline Mountain Way (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This is one of the more challenging of the many possible hiking routes in the Verdugo Mountains.  It features an interesting mix of abandoned and modern fire roads, fire breaks and city streets.  Like the other hikes in the Verdugo Mountains, if the air is clear, the views are extensive, including downtown L.A., Catalina Island, the San Gabriels and much more. The loop can be hiked in either direction but when done clockwise, as described below, the ridge shields you from the morning sun on the western-facing ascent.

0:40 - Lone oak on the Skyline Mountain Way (times are approximate)

0:40 – Lone oak on  Skyline Mountain Way (times are approximate)

From the corner of Via Montana and Camino de Villas, head across a dirt lot and climb a steep embankment to the Skyline Mountain Way, an abandoned fire road. The hike starts of gradually but soon begins a steady ascent; you’ll climb about 1,600 feet in less than three miles. As you get higher the views open up. The trail becomes more overgrown although the going shouldn’t be too difficult.

0:45 - Difficult terrain on Skyline Mountain Way

0:45 – Difficult terrain on Skyline Mountain Way

At about 1.6 miles you pass a solitary oak; this is a nice spot to take a breather. Soon afterward you encounter a tricky stretch where the trail is washed out. Expect to use your hands and feet as you make your way across this short but potentially treacherous section, climbing up a particularly steep and loose embankment before making a hairpin right turn and continuing the climb.

1:15 - Enjoying the view of the San Gabriels from the top of the loop

1:15 – Enjoying the view of the San Gabriels from the top of the loop

The ascent becomes more moderate and at 2.5 miles, you meet up with the Verdugo Fire Road, the main route across the top of the range, at a saddle with some great views of the San Gabriel Mountains. You can bear left on the fire road or head uphill on a steeper fire break. The two routes soon meet at a junction where a bench allows you to enjoy views both to the north and the south.

2:30 - Sycamores near the bottom of the Brand Motorway

2:30 – Sycamores near the bottom of the Brand Motorway

The rest of the hike is rather tame by comparison; some hikers might want to turn around at this point and return via the same route. However, for those who want to continue and make the hike a loop, start your descent on the Brand Motorway. It drops steadily for the next 3.3 miles, winding around the ridges. At 6 miles from the start, the road becomes paved; stay right at a junction and continue your descent, arriving at Brand Park, where you can take a look at the former estate of the Brand family and the public library dating back to the early 1900s.

2:50 - The road becomes paved above Brand Park

2:50 – The road becomes paved above Brand Park

At 6.8 miles, you pass through a gate and end up on Mountain Street. Turn right and follow it for 1.2 miles, during which it becomes Sunset Canyon. Several blocks do not have sidewalks, so exercise appropriate caution. When you reach Tujunga Avenue turn right and begin a steep climb uphill (again, no sidewalks so watch out for cars, especially since this section of the road has several blind curves.) Tujunga becomes Camino de Villas, which you will follow back to your starting point.

3:00 - Back to civilization: Brand Park

3:00 – Back to civilization: Brand Park

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

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Mt. Lukens via Crescenta View and Rim of the Valley Trails


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Looking north from the Mt. Lukens summit

Looking north from the Mt. Lukens summit

View of the Verdugo Mountains from the Crescent View Trail

View of the Verdugo Mountains from the Crescent View Trail

Mt. Lukens via Crescenta View and Rim of the Valley Trails

    • Location: 3429 Markridge Road, Glendale.   From the 210 freeway, take the Pennsylvania Ave. exit and head north for 1.1 miles.  Turn left on Brookhill St., go 0.3 miles and turn right on New York Ave. Go 0.7 miles and turn left on Markridge, and the park is on the right.
    • Agency: City of Glendale Parks & Recreation (Deukmejian Wilderness Park), Angles National Forest/Los Angeles River Ranger District
    • Distance 10 miles
    • Elevation gain: 2,900 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: R (Steepness, elevation gain, distance, terrain)
    • Suggested time: 5.5 hours
    • Best season: November – May (lot open 7am – sunset daily)
    • USGS topo map: Sunland, Burbank, Condor Peak
    • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sunblock; sun hat
    • More information:  Trip report here; Summit Post page here; Everytrail report here
    • Rating: 9

Mt. Lukens is notable as being the highest point in the city limits of Los Angeles, and also the westernmost major summit of the San Gabriels. There are several routes to the top. This trip makes a loop from Deukmejian Wilderness Park in Glendale, ascending via the Crescenta View Trail and descending via the Rim of the Valley Trail. The views on both legs of the hike are great; if visibility is good, expect to see Old Saddleback, Catalina Island, Santa Barbara Island, the entire Santa Monica range and more. The antennas on top of Lukens prevent it from being one of So Cal’s all-time great hikes, but it’s still an essential peak. The route from Deukmejian is easily accessible to L.A. and the Valley, and requires no Adventure Pass, as the Stone Canyon approach does.

Information board at the start of the trail (click thumbnails to see the full sized pictures)

Information board at the start of the trail (click thumbnails to see the full sized pictures)

From north end of the parking area, turn right at the information board and make your way up into Dunsmore Canyon. You pass by a tree that survived the Station Fire, and the antennas on top of Lukens will be visible in the distance. The Le Mesnager Loop, your return route, branches off to the left at 0.3 miles, and at 0.5, head right (downhill) on a rough-looking single-track, the Crescenta View Trail. This trail crosses the canyon and begins a steep, rugged ascent, climbing about 2,000 feet over the next 2.5 miles. The Station Fire and numerous landslides have made the route difficult to follow in some parts. The good news is that it the steep climb gives some great views pretty quickly, including the Verdugos, the Hollywood Hills and downtown L.A.

0:52 - Steep ascent on the Crescenta View Trail (times are approximate)

0:32 – Steep ascent on the Crescenta View Trail (times are approximate)

A neatly arranged circle of stones, about 2 miles from the start, provides a nice place to take a break, with great views to the south. Beyond this point, the trail begins a steep ascent up a ridge, finally arriving at a fire road signed both as the Pickens Spur and Forest Road 2n76C. Here, you finally get a little bit of a break, as you only have an additional 600 feet to climb over the next 1.8 miles to reach the summit, which is prominently visible on the left.

1:11 - Stone circle and viewing area

1:11 – Stone circle and viewing area

At 3.5 miles from the start, you reach Mt. Lukens Road, where you are rewarded with a great view of the Big Tujunga area of the Angeles National Forest. Strawberry Peak, San Gabriel Peak and Mt. Wilson are all easily seen; depending on visibility, you may be able to see farther to some of the high summits of the back country.

Head left on Mt. Lukens Road and walk the last easy mile to the summit, enjoying great views of the Valley and L.A. At the summit, you can walk to the end of a dirt road and get some more great views to the west.

1:42 - Getting easier on the Pickens Spur

1:42 – Getting easier on the Pickens Spur

You can return by the same route, but to make a loop, continue on Mt. Lukens Road, heading downhill and northwest. After a quarter mile, turn right at the junction and begin a long, winding descent along the mountain’s southwest flank. At 7.6 miles (3 below the summit), the road continues to the right toward Haines Canyon, but to get back to Deukmejian Park, turn left on the steep Rim of the Valley Trail.

1:52 - Head left on the fire road

1:52 – Head left on the fire road

You make some steep switchbacks, taking in great views along the way. There are a few places where the trail clings precariously to the side of the ridge, which may test the nerves of some hikers (particularly those with any kind of fear of heights.) At 8.8 miles, you get a pleasant surprise (well, I guess it’s not a surprise anymore) as the trail dips into wooded Cook Canyon. A seasonal stream runs through the bottom of the canyon, and the shade is a nice contrast from the exposed terrain thus far.

2:20 - You made it!

2:20 – You made it!

After crossing the stream, you make a final, brief ascent, joining the Le Mesnager Loop trail. Now, you’re more or less home free as you turn right and follow the trail back down into Dunsmore Canyon, enjoying a few last dramatic views of the mountains above. At 9.8 miles, you reach the Dunsmore Canyon Trail. Turn right and head back downhill to the parking lot, and give yourself a pat on the back for conquering the tallest peak in Los Angeles.

2:50 - Heading back to L.A.

2:50 – Heading back to L.A.

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or

3:45 - Head left on the Rim of the World Trail

3:45 – Head left on the Rim of the Valley Trail

publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up

4:30 - Stream crossing in Cook Canyon

4:30 – Stream crossing in Cook Canyon

to date trail condition information.

La Tuna Canyon Loop (Verdugo Mountains)


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Bench on the Verudgo Motorway

Downtown L.A. from the Verdugo Motorway

La Tuna Canyon Loop (Verdugo Mountains)

    • Location: Sun Valley.  From I-210, take the La Tuna Canyon exit and and head west for 1.4 miles.  Look for the third dirt turnout on the left side of the road (there is one almost immediately, one in about a mile and then the third one, which is the La Tuna Trailhead.
    • Agency:  Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy
    • Distance: 6.7 miles
    • Elevation gain: 2,000 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (Elevation gain, steepness, trail condition, distance)
    • Suggested time: 3.5 hours
    • Best season:  October – May
    • USGS topo maps: “Burbank”
    • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sun hat
    • More information: here; Everytrail report here
    • Rating: 7

This is one of the more challenging routes in the Verdugo Mountains, with steep climbs, sharp drop-offs and loose stretches. The rewards, however, are great views that, on clear days, include the L.A. skyline, the San Gabriel Mountains, the Santa Anas and more. The hike can also be enjoyable when fog hangs over the trails, creating a sense of isolation hard to find in the San Fernando Valley.

From the parking area, the trail wastes no time ascending, climbing the wall of the canyon on a series of long switchbacks. A flat area and a slight descent, during which you can see the return route across the way, bring you to a wooded area. You may notice the ruins of an old truck lying among the oaks. After this stretch, you begin one of the steepest parts of the climb, which brings you to a fire road where you can take a well-deserved break on a wooden bench, facing toward the western end of the Verdugos.

On the Verdugo Fire Road, the main drag through the range, head left and continue climbing, at a more moderate grade. You follow the course of the fire road for two miles, with nice views of the Los Angeles basin on your right. Head left on the signed Plantation Lateral fire road, and in 0.3 miles, look for the La Tuna Foot Trail heading off to the left. The next two miles take you down (with a few short climbs) along a backbone ridge, with dramatic aerial views of I-210. For the most part, the trail is easy to follow, although there are some places where it is quite loose.

After switchbacking your way down the ridge, the other parking area comes into view. Near the bottom, the trail becomes very faint; just stick close to the side of the canyon wall. At the very bottom, you’ll pass by a seasonal waterfall set a little ways back from the trail. When you reach the dirt lot, turn left onto La Tuna Canyon Road. Although there is no sidewalk, the shoulder is fairly wide, so if you’re careful, you shouldn’t have any problems on the 0.4 mile walk back to the trail head. After the rough descent, even hikers who hate pavement will probably be glad to see it here.

Text and photography copyright 2011 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Deukmejian Wilderness Park


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Dunsmore Canyon from the Le Mesnager Trail

Stream at the top of the Dunsmore Canyon Trail

Text and photography copyright 2011 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. The author does not take any responsibility for injuries sustained during hikes or walks on the routes described here. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Deukmejian Wilderness Park

  • Location: 3429 Markridge Road, Glendale.   From the 210 freeway, take the Pennsylvania Ave. exit and head north for 1.1 miles.  Turn left on Brookhill St., go 0.3 miles and turn right on New York Ave. Go 0.7 miles and turn left on Markridge, and the park is on the right.
  • Agency: Glendale Parks & Recreation
  • Distance: 2.4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 900 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
  • Best season: October – June
  • USGS topo map: Sunland, Burbank, Condor Peak
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot & Afield Los Angeles County
  • More information: here
  • Rating: 6

For a short hike, this trip provides a lot of scenic variety – and quite a good workout as well.  While “Afoot and Afield” considers it a year-round hike, having attempted it in July a few years ago, I respectfully beg to differ.

From the parking lot, pick up the dirt road leading uphill.  Take a right at the first junction and the a left, which brings you to the main trail ascending into Dunsmore Canyon.  You pass by a large oak that survived the Station Fire of 2009, and soon afterward, you reach a junction with your return route, the Le Mesnager Trail.  Stay straight and begin a steep, shadeless ascent into Dunsmore Canyon.  As you get higher into the mountains, you round a bend and suddenly things become quieter (and cooler) as the noise from the 210 freeway and other points below is blocked out.  The Le Mesnager Trail rejoins the Dunsmore Canyon Trail, which soon comes to an end, a mile from the parking lot.  Here, you can walk down to the water, where two creeks converge, and enjoy a quiet break before heading back.

You can, of course, simply retrace your steps on the Dunsmore Canyon Trail, but for more variety, I suggest making a loop out of this hike.  To do this, bare right on the Le Mesnager Trail and head uphill briefly.  A short spur takes you to a spot where you get a nice view of Glendale and the Verudg and Santa Monica Mountains.  (You may spot San Jacinto and the Santa Anas to the east if the air is clear).

The trail starts switchbacking downhill.  You pass a junction for the Rim of the Valley Trail and make a hairpin turn to the left, passing around the bottom of the knoll.  You can take another spur to get more views if you like, while the trail continues downhill, switchbacking through a garden and meeting back up with the fire road.  Head right and retrace your steps to the parking lot.

Stough Canyon Loop


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Looking down at the LA Basin from Stough Canyon

Looking down at the LA Basin from Stough Canyon

Ascending the fire road, Stough Canyon

Text and photography copyright 2010 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved.  Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability.  All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  The author does not take any responsibility for injuries sustained during hikes or walks on the routes described here.   Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Stough Canyon Loop

  • Location: Verdugo Mountains near Burbank, at the Stough Canyon Nature Center, 2300 Walnut Ave.  From the I-5 freeway, take the Burbank Blvd. exit.  Turn right on Burbank Blvd. and take an immediate left on San Fernando.  Go right on Delaware and in 0.2 miles go right on Glenoaks.  Take a quick left on Walnut and follow it to its end at the nature center (1.8 miles.)  From the north, take the Scott Road exit on I-5, bear right on San Fernando and take a left onto Delaware.
  • Agency: City of Burbank
  • Distance: 2.4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 900 feet
  • Suggested time: 1 1/2 hours
  • Difficulty Rating: PG
  • Best season: October – June
  • USGS topo map: “Burbank”
  • Recommended gear: hiking poles; sun hat
  • More information: here; info on the nature center here (including video)
  • Rating: 6

Sometimes I feel like the more I know about hiking in L.A., the less I know.

The Verdugo Mountains are a particularly intriguing place, often overlooked in favor of the nearby Hollywood Hills,  Santa Monicas and San Gabriels – but they offer quick, convenient, great workouts.  For some reason, these hikes often feel very different from each other, even though they are usually pretty close as the crow flies.  The Stough Canyon loop is a fun trip that provides a good workout without being too intense.  It can also easily be linked with several other trails in the area for a longer hike.

From the parking area at the nature center, head up the fire road.  The beginning of the trail is fairly steep as it makes a quick S-curve, but once you get used to the grade it’s not that tough.  Look for a trail branching off to the left at half a mile.  (The loop can be hiked in either direction, but here we’ll describe it clockwise.)  You take this left and continue your climb.  Almost immediately, you get to a split, where a short spur to the left climbs to a point where you get nice views of the Hollywood Hills and the Burbank airport.

The main route continues, past the ruins of an old camp building.  After some more steady climbing, the trail tops out on a ridge, where you can see your return route below.  The trail dips down, heading northwest to join the Verudgo Fire Road.  Head right, coming soon to a clearing where the Stough Canyon road leads downhill back to the nature center.  A few benches make this a nice spot to take a break, where you can see the San Gabriels to the north and the L.A. Basin to the right.

On the way back down the fire road, you get more nice city views, and you pass by some interesting geology.  After 0.9 miles, you return to the first intersection, and you retrace your steps to the parking lot.  If the nature center is open, you can spend some extra time there; also be sure to check out the nature trail, with trees planted by some local girl scouts.  See, the money you spent on those cookies was put to good use!

Vital Link Trail


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Flowers on the Vital Link Trail, Burbank

Descending the Vital Link Trail

Vital Link Trail

  • Location: north of Burbank in the Verdugo Mountains.  From I-5 in Burbank, take the Olive Avenue exit.  Go northeast for 1.2 miles on Olive, take a left on Sunset Canyon Drive, go half a mile and take a right on Harvard Road.  After 0.6 miles, go right on Wildwood Canyon Road, into the park, and go 0.3 miles to the second trailhead.
  • Agency:  Wildwood Canyon Park (phone: 818-238-5440)
  • Distance: 3.6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,600 feet
  • Difficulty Rating:  PG-13 (Steepness, elevation gain)
  • Suggested time: 2.5 hours
  • Best season:  October – May
  • Recommended gear: Hiking Poles
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot & Afield Los Angeles County
  • USGS topo maps: “Burbank”
  • More information:  here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 7

The Vital Link trail of Burbank will have you burning more calories per mile than almost any other hike out there.  This short but very steep climb up a narrow ridge is not for the timid.  However, if you know what you’re getting yourself into, it’s a very enjoyable, easy to get to hike, especially for residents of downtown L.A. and the Valley.

The trail starts easily enough (from the second of the four trailheads in the park), wind your way up the canyon, beneath some oaks.  Enjoy the shade, there’s none on the rest of the trail (bring more water than you usually would for such a short hike).   Stay right at the next two junctions, as trails come in on the left from alternate starting points.  A third trail comes in from below; stay left and continue heading uphill.  At about 0.7 miles from the start, look for the Vital Link trail branching off to the left, just before a spur that leads to some picnic tables.

The Vital Link trail ascends the ridge, with great views on both sides.  You can see your goal in front of you, the Verdugo Fire Road.   There are points where the trail may seem a little obscure, but just continue heading up and you’ll reach your destination.  There’s a split on the way up; head right (the left route, which eventually rejoins, tends to get washed out.)

At the top, enjoy some well-earned views of the San Gabriel Mountains to the north and Burbank to the south.  If your thirst for hiking hasn’t been quenched, you can extend this trip by heading either way on the fire road, but most hikers will probably be happy to just head back down as they came.

On the descent, on which you will be glad if you brought hiking poles, enjoy great views of Burbank and the Hollywood Hills.   If your experience was like mine, odds are you’ll be offering encouragement to tired hikers climbing the last stretch to the fire road.

Text and photography copyright 2012 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Oakmont Loop


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Featured in the Nobody Hikes in L.A. guidebook!

View of the San Gabriels from the Oakmont Loop

View of the San Gabriels from the Oakmont Loop

Woodlands in Englehard Canyon

Woodlands in Engleheard Canyon

Text and photography copyright 2010 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved.  Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability.  All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  The author does not take any responsibility for injuries sustained during hikes or walks on the routes described here.   Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

Oakmont Loop

      • Location: Verdugo Mountains in northeastern Glendale.  From I-210, take La Crescenta Avenue south for about a mile.  You will pass Eilinita, one of the residential streets this hike visits.  Just after La Crescenta Avenue curves to the left, take a right on Oakmont View Drive.  Follow this winding residential street for about a mile to its end at Oakmont View Park.  Park in the lot and follow the signs to the beginning of the trail.  Parking is free.
      • Agency: Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy/Verdugo Open Space
      • Distance: 2.5 miles
      • Elevation gain: 600 feet
      • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
      • Difficulty Rating: PG
      • Best season: Year round; best in the late afternoon or evening
      • USGS topo map: “Pasadena”
      • Recommended gear: sun hat
      • More information: here; trip description here; Everytrail report (slightly different route and starting point) here
      • Rating: 5

This enjoyable loop is conveniently located to Glendale, Burbank and La Canada.  Its location on the north-facing slopes of the Verdugo Mountains makes it a good year-round hike (although you’ll want to plan accordingly on hot summer days. The scenic highlights include attractive woodlands and panoramic views of the San Gabriel Mountains.

From the parking area, head northeast on a fire road. The return route joins in from the right as you make a brief climb. After about 0.3 miles you begin a long descent, switchbacking your way into the canyon. At the bottom of the hill, you enter a peaceful forest of oaks and sycamores. You follow the trail as it parallels a private road, soon emerging at Eilinita Avenue (about 1.3 miles from the start.)

Follow Eilinita a short distance to Emanuel Drive and bear right, briefly climbing uphill. At the end of Emanuel (1.6 miles from the start) pick up the Edison Fire Road, which drops into another grove of oaks before beginning a rigorous ascent to return to the parking area.

The trail climbs about 500 feet over the next 0.8 miles but your efforts are rewarded with some great views of the San Gabriel Mountains. At 2.4 miles, you complete the loop, returning to the paved road. Take a hard left and retrace your steps back to the car.

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