Lizard Rock via Hill Canyon


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Sunset from Lizard Rock
Sunset from Lizard Rock
Looking south toward the Santa Monica Mountains from Lizard Rock
Looking south toward the Santa Monica Mountains from Lizard Rock

Lizard Rock via Hill Canyon

      • Location: Northwest of Thousand Oaks.  From Highway 101, take Moorpark Road north for 5.5 miles.  At a four-way intersection, stay straight to get on Santa Rosa Road.  Go 3.7 miles and turn left on Hill Canyon Road (signed for Santa Rosa Regional Park).  Go half a mile and park in the dirt lot on the right side of the road.  From Highway 23, take the Tierra Rejada Road exit and head west for 0.5 miles.  Turn left on Moorpark Road, go 1.4 miles and turn right on Santa Rosa and follow it to the park.  Note: As of September 10, 2013, a moratorium has been placed on park fees (previously $2 per car on weekdays, $4 on weekends) so parking is free.  Check the Santa Rosa Park link below for up to date information.
      • Agency: Conejo Open Space Foundation/Santa Rosa Park
      • Distance: 2,4 miles
      • Elevation gain: 900 feet
      • Difficulty Rating: PG
      • Suggested time: 1.5 hours
      • Best season: October-May (open daily from 7:30 am to between 5 and 8 pm depending on season)
      • USGS topo map: Newbury Park
      • Recommended gear: sunblock; sun hat
      • More information: Video of the beginning of the hike here; Everytrail report here; Trail map here
      • Rating: 7
0:00 - Trail head, Hill Canyon Road (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)
0:00 – Trail head, Hill Canyon Road (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

Lizard Rock is Wildwood Park’s second most famous landmark, after Paradise Falls.   The 932-foot outcrop can be reached by several possible routes starting from the park’s main entrance, but in this post we’ll look at a less traveled, challenging and scenic approach from the west, starting at Hill Canyon.

0:15 - Looking down into the canyon from one of the switchbacks (times are approximate)
0:15 – Looking down into the canyon from one of the switchbacks (times are approximate)

A single-track trail starts on the east side of the road, directly across from the entrance to the parking area. (The “official” trail beginning is a little farther down the road, but since cars aren’t allowed past the parking lot, you would have to walk there, so you can save some time by cutting across.) The single-track soon meets the main trail. Turn left and begin a steep series of switchbacks, gaining about 550 feet 3/4 of a mile. The good news is that as you climb you get better and better views, in particular Hill Canyon and Boney Mountain to the south.

0:20 - Bench for some well deserved relaxation
0:20 – Bench for some well deserved relaxation

At 3/4 of a mile, you reach a saddle where you can get some well-earned rest on a bench, enjoying a nice view of the park to the east. The trail continues ascending briefly before beginning a descent. You pass by an unofficial trail heading down into the canyon and soon begin climbing, soon reaching a Y-junction (1 mile). Bear right and begin a steep ascent on a trail that is a little overgrown in places but overall pretty easy to follow. In 0.2 miles and 200 vertical feet, you arrive on a summit. Head left and find Lizard Rock, an outcrop that is pretty easy to climb.

0:23 - Descent to the saddle past the bench
0:23 – Descent to the saddle past the bench

From Lizard Rock, you get a 360-degree view that includes Mt. Clef and the rest of the park to the east, the Santa Monica Mountains to the south and, if visibility is good, the ocean and Santa Cruz Island to the east. It’s a particularly good place to watch the sunset. You can return via the same route, or extend your hike on Wildwood Park’s network of trails.

0:27 - The split: Head right and uphill toward Lizard Rock
0:27 – The split: Head right and uphill toward Lizard Rock

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

0:40 - Looking down from just below Lizard Rock
0:40 – Looking down from just below Lizard Rock
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