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Burnt Pinyon Pine on the trail to Chaparossa Peak

Burnt Pinyon Pine on the trail to Chaparossa Peak

High desert geology on the way to Chaparrosa Peak

High desert geology on the way to Chaparrosa Peak

Chaparrosa Peak (Pioneertown Mountains Preserve/Pipes Canyon)

  • Location: High desert near Yucca Valley.  From I-10, take Highway 62 northeast for 20 miles.  Turn left on Pioneertown Road and go northwest for 7.5 miles.  At a four-way intersection, take a left on dirt Pipes Canyon Road and drive 0.7 miles to the park entrance.  Bear right and drive an additional 0.2 miles into the parking area.
  • Agency: Wildlands Conservancy/Pioneertown Mountains Preserve
  • Distance: 5.6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1,250 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: PG-13 (elevation gain, terrain, navigation)
  • Suggested time: 3 hours
  • Best season:  October – May; trail open 8am – 5pm
  • USGS topo map: “Rim Rock”
  • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock; hiking poles
  • More information:  Trip description here; Everytrail report here; photos and maps from the loop version of the hike (currently inaccessible) here
  • Rating: 9
0:00 - Beginning of the hike, leaving the parking area (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

0:00 – Beginning of the hike, leaving the parking area (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

It may be a long drive from L.A., but Chaparrosa Peak is well worth the trip.  It offers a hiking experience similar to that of Joshua Tree National Park, nearby Warren Peak in particular.  Highlights include mountain views, jumbled rock formations and great panoramas of the high desert.  The hike isn’t too difficult but navigation and terrain are tricky, so novice hikers might not want to do this one alone.  The trail is also almost completely exposed and the area is susceptible to high winds.

0:04 - Beginning of the Chaparrosa Trail (times are approximate)

0:04 – Beginning of the Chaparrosa Trail (times are approximate)

It used to be possible to climb Chaparossa Peak as a loop hike, but as of this writing the Indian Loop trail is closed for repairs, so your only option is a 5.6-mile out and back (park literature has the distance at 6.6 miles, but Everytrail measured it as 5.6)

After signing in at the ranger station, head uphill on a dirt road leading from the parking area. After a short distance you come to a staging area where you will see a sign for the Chaparrosa Peak Trail. The single-track dips in and out of a canyon before climbing to join a dirt road (about 0.5 miles.) You ascend steadily, enjoying nice views of the Sawtooth Mountains and Pioneertown to the south, passing two gates (0.7 and 0.9 miles respectively). To navigate around the second gate, climb uphill briefly to the end of the fence before continuing on the road.

0:39 - Turn right on the single-track

0:39 – Turn right on the single-track

At 1.3 miles, head right and uphill on a trail leading away from the dirt road (GPS N34 09.632, W116 33.034). You begin a challenging ascent over loose terrain. The trail isn’t always clear; keep an eye out for the ducks. After gaining 200 feet in less than a quarter mile, the trail levels out and you’re rewarded for your efforts with some great views of the desert to the north. The trail descends briefly and climbs again to a junction (2.1 miles, GPS N34 39.331, W116 33.627). Head left on a spur signed for Chaparrosa Peak.

1:15 - Trail ducks on the cutoff trail to Chaparossa Peak; turn right and follow the ridge to the summit

1:15 – Trail ducks on the cutoff trail to Chaparossa Peak; turn right and follow the ridge to the summit

The trail becomes tougher to follow as it works its way through a wash, heading south to a ridge where it makes a sharp right turn (2.5 miles).  You begin the final steep ascent to the summit, passing by a large rock that resembles an oven mitt.  Finally you reach the peak (elevation 5,541; GPS N34 38.990, W116 33.845), where you can enjoy a 360-degree panorama, including San Jacinto, the eastern end of the San Bernardino range and the Mojave Desert to the north.

1:22 -

1:22 – “Cookies are done!”

If you enjoyed this hike, be sure to check out some of the other open spaces overseen by the Wildlands Conservancy, such as the nearby Whitewater Canyon Preserve and Oak Glen Preserve.

Text and photography copyright 2013 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

1:30 - San Jacinto above the clouds, looking southwest from Chaparossa Peak

1:30 – San Jacinto above the clouds, looking southwest from Chaparossa Peak

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