Narrows Earth Trail (Anza Borrego Desert State Park)


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Ocotillo "arch" on the Narrows Earth Trail
Ocotillo “arch” on the Narrows Earth Trail

Narrows Earth Trail (Anza Borrego Desert State Park)

  • Location: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park east of Julian and south of Borrego Springs.  From Julian, take Highway 78 east for 23.1 miles and look for a parking area on the right side of the road near mile marker 81.5.  From Borrego Springs, take Borrego Springs Road southeast for 11.5 miles to Highway 78.  Turn right (west) and go 3.9 miles.  The trailhead will be on your left.  From Highway 79, take San Felipe Road/County Road S-2 (3.6 miles south of Warner Springs, 4.3 miles north of the junction with Highway 76) southeast, 16.8 miles to Highway 78.  Turn left (east) and go 11.5 miles to the trailhead on the right side of the road.
  • Agency: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
  • Distance: 0.5 miles
  • Elevation gain: 50 feet
  • Difficulty Rating: G
  • Suggested time: 30 minutes
  • Best season: Year round
  • USGS topo map:  “Borrego Sink”
  • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield San Diego County
  • More information: Trip description here; Everytrail report here
  • Rating: 4
0:00 - Trailhead on Highway 78 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)
0:00 – Trailhead on Highway 78 (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This short but interesting hike showcases some of the Anza Borrego Desert’s geology.  The trailhead is conveniently located off of Highway 78, one of the park’s major arteries, making it a nice stop to or from a longer hike.  Because it’s so short,  it is one of the park’s few year-round hikes.

0:06 - Slot in the rocks (times are approximate)
0:06 – Slot in the rocks (times are approximate)

From the parking area, follow the signs for the loop. If there are pamphlets in the box near the beginning, you can pick one up and read about the geological features, including metasedimentary rock thought to be half a billion years old. You pass by a slot in the rock wall on the left side of the trail and then a small round cave. It’s at this point that the trail turns around, though you can explore a little farther up the canyon if you see fit.

0:09 - Rock cave near the south end of the loop
0:09 – Rock cave near the south end of the loop

Heading back to the parking area, you pass by another cave and underneath an arch-like branch of ocotillo. The trail is less defined at this point but with the highway as close as it is, route finding and terrain shouldn’t be an issue.

0:10 - Looking up the canyon at the south end of the loop
0:10 – Looking up the canyon at the south end of the loop

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities.  By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail.  Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

0:15 - Cave on the return leg of the loop
0:15 – Cave on the return leg of the loop
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