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View of the Chino Hills from the Sonome Canyon Loop

View of Gilman Peak and Carbon Canyon from Olinda Drive

Two oak trees, Chino HIlls Stat Park

Oaks on the La Vida Trail, Chino Hills State park

Sonome Canyon Loop (Chino Hills State Park)

    • Location: Olinda Village, Carbon Canyon, northeast Orange County. From the 57 Freeway, take the Lambert Rd. exit and head east for 4.4 miles (Lambert becomes Carbon Canyon Road/Highway 142 en route). Turn left on Olinda Place and almost immediately take another left onto Lilac Lane. Follow Lilac half a mile to its end. From Chino Hills Parkway, take Highway 142/Carbon Canyon Road southwest for 5.8 miles and turn right on Olinda Place, then immediately left onto Lilac.
    • Agency: Chino Hills State Park
    • Distance: 4.2 miles
    • Elevation gain: 950 feet
    • Difficulty Rating: PG
    • Suggested time: 2 hours
    • Best season: October – May; trail is open from 8am to 5 pm
    • Recommended gear: sun hat; sunblock
    • Recommended guidebook: Afoot and Afield: Orange County
    • USGS topo map: Yorba Linda
    • More information: Trail map here; Chino Hills Park homepage here
    • Rating: 5
Start of the Sonome Canyon Loop, Chino Hills State Park

0:00 – Trail head at the end of Lilac Lane (click thumbnails to see the full sized versions)

This loop explores the lightly visited corner of Chino Hills State Park that sits north of Carbon Canyon Road. Some hikers might be turned off by the fact that a substantial portion of the hike is on paved streets and that the trails have little shade, but the loop provides a good workout conveniently located to north Orange County and the Inland Empire, with panoramic views of the area. With the Bane Canyon entrance to the park closed until April of 2015, this hike makes a nice alternative, especially for hikers who feel as if they’ve run out of trails to explore in this area.

Steep ascent on the Sonome Canyon Loop, Chino HIlls State Park

0:09 – Steep ascent under the telephone lines (times are approximate)

The hike can be done in either direction and with over a mile of the route using residential streets, there are several possible starting points. Hiking clockwise from the end of Lilac Lane as described here is advantageous in that it breaks up the longest ascent of the hike and bypasses the thankless task of a steep, exposed climb on paved Olinda Drive. If you are hiking in the late afternoon, you can plan to time your hike so that you are off park lands by 5pm, finishing the route on the residential streets.

La Vida Trail, Chino HIlls State Park

0:21 – Bear right at the top of the ridge onto the La Vida Trail

From the end of Lilac, follow the trail into the park. The route is signed as the Lilac Trail on the park map but as the Sonome Canyon Trail at the park entrance. It ascends steadily, making a sharp right turn at about 0.3 miles and climbing a ridge beneath telephone lines. Make your way uphill, following either the winding path or the steep fire break. At about 0.7 miles from the start (450 vertical feet), the trail levels out. Look for a dirt path branching off to the right (La Vida Trail on the map) and take it.

Sonome Canyon, Chino HIlls State Park

0:49 – Entering Sonome Canyon

You now begin a mile-long descent into Sonome Canyon, a tributary of Carbon Canyon. This stretch of the trail is enjoyably quiet, you are on the north side of the ridge which blocks out much of the sounds of civilization. If visibility is good, you can see the San Gabriels poking above the opposite side of the canyon.

Oaks in Sonome Canyon, Chino Hills State Park

0:53 – Oaks in Sonome Canyon, shortly before the big ascent

At 1.7 miles, you reach the bottom of Sonome Canyon. The trail stays level until the two mile mark, when it makes a hairpin right turn and begins a steady ascent to another ridge (2.5 miles). Here, you reach a T-junction with paved Olinda Drive, where can enjoy a panoramic view to the south including the Chino Hills, Santa Ana Mountains and Orange County’s coastal plain.

View from Olinda Drive, Chino HIlls State Park

1:10 – Looking east from Olinda Drive after climbing out of the canyon

Head downhill on Olinda Drive which is open only to service vehicles, enjoying an aerial perspective on Carbon Canyon. After 0.6 miles, the road leaves the park and becomes residential. It continues its steep descent for another half mile before reaching a junction with Olinda Place, by the fire station. Turn right, go a short distance on Olinda and turn right again on Lilac. Follow it uphill, gradually gaining 100 feet of elevation on the way back to your starting point.

Brea Fire Station, Olinda

1:35 – Brea Fire Station (turn right onto Olinda Place)

Text and photography copyright 2014 by David W. Lockeretz, all rights reserved. Information and opinions provided are kept current to the best of the author’s ability. All readers hike at their own risk, and should be aware of the possible dangers of hiking, walking and other outdoor activities. By reading this, you agree not to hold the author or publisher of the content on this web site responsible for any injuries or inconveniences that may result from hiking on this trail. Check the informational links provided for up to date trail condition information.

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